Polaris Ranger Forum - Header Left   Polaris Ranger Forum - Header Right

Alabama hunting Seasons and Limits

This is a discussion on Alabama hunting Seasons and Limits within the Hunting Land and Leases forums, part of the Trail Riding and Hunting Section category; 2008-2009 Hunting Season ALL PERSONS HUNTING ON PRIVATE LANDS OF ANOTHER MUST HAVE WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM THE LANDOWNER WITH FEW EXCEPTIONS. HUNTING BY THE AID ...

Go Back   RangerForums.net - Polaris Ranger Forum > Trail Riding and Hunting Section > Hunting Land and Leases

Hunting Land and Leases Land for lease or clubs needing members

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-25-2008, 08:54 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
caglezxj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,313
Send a message via Yahoo to caglezxj
Alabama hunting Seasons and Limits

2008-2009 Hunting Season

ALL PERSONS HUNTING ON PRIVATE LANDS OF ANOTHER MUST HAVE WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM THE LANDOWNER WITH FEW EXCEPTIONS. HUNTING BY THE AID OF BAIT IS ILLEGAL IN ALABAMA. ALL REQUIRED HUNTING AND FISHING LICENSES MUST BE IN POSSESSION WHEN HUNTING OR FISHING.

NOTICE: SEE HUNTER ORANGE REQUIREMENT AND DEFINITION OF OPEN PERMIT- PUBLIC LAND. CONSULT MANAGEMENT AREA LEAFLET FOR SPECIAL RULES, REGULATIONS AND SEASONS BEFORE HUNTING STATE WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS.

Any party controlling hunting rights may, by choice, be more restrictive on seasons and bag limits than those stipulated below.

HUNTING SEASONS-LIMITS
Deer

Coyote

Hunter Orange Requirement
Special Early Canada Goose

Fox

Open Permit-Public Land
Legal Arms, Ammunition

Hunter Safety

Bear, Mountain Lion, Alligator, Ruffed Grouse
Harvest Management

Deer Management Plan

Beaver, Nutria, Groundhog
Info on Deer Season
Duck, Coot, Merganser

Rail, Purple Gallinule, Common Moorhens
Turkey
White-Tailed Deer

Youth Waterfowl Days
Deer: Special Youth Day
Buck/Doe Harvest

Deer Knowledge
Opossum Snipe Feral Swine
Trapping Bobcat Starlings, Crows, Blackbirds
Rabbit Mourning Dove Adaptive Hunting
Opossum Special Teal Season Raccoon
Trapping Woodcock Squirrel
Rabbit Geese Bobwhite Quail


DEER

ANTLERED BUCKS- bare antlers visible above natural hairline - Statewide - one a day - three during all combined seasons. Antler Restrictions (except Barbour County) - one of the three must have at least 4 antler points 1" or longer on one antler. Barbour County Antler Restriction - Except on the statewide special youth deer hunting date, harvest of white-tailed deer bucks in Barbour County will be limited to those that have a minimum of three points on one side. A point is an antler projection of at least one inch in length from base to tip. Main beam tip shall be counted as a point regardless of length. See Mandatory Harvest Record..

UNANTLERED DEER (except spotted fawns) - During the Unantlered Deer Gun, Special Muzzleloader, Bow and Arrow, and Spear Seasons, two deer per day - only one of which may be an antlered buck (two unantlered deer; or, one unantlered deer and one antlered deer).

SPECIAL YOUTH (UNDER 16) DEER HUNTING- Statewide on November 10- 11, Hunter's Choice (except spotted fawns - one deer per day), and also by dog hunting in those counties or parts of counties where and how it is allowed during the regular dog deer hunting season. Same legal arms and ammunition apply as in Unantlered Deer season, in accordance with Rule 220-2-.119.

MUZZELLOADER AND BOW AND ARROW (INCLUDING CROSSBOWS) AND SPEAR -STALK HUNTING ONLY (NO DOGS), two deer per day only one of which may be an antlered buck (Two unantlered deer or one unantlered deer and one antlered deer , except Spotted Fawns). See Special Antler Restriction For Barbour County.

SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS: If notes 1, 2 or 3 appear by the county listed, see the special exceptions at the end of this chart. Note (1) relates to dog deer hunting. Note (2) relates to US Corp of Engineers Muzzleloading Season. Note (3) relates to National Forest Service Lands.



Antlered Bucks
Dog or Stalk
Hunting

Antlered Bucks
Stalk Hunting Only
No Dogs or Buckshot

Unantlered
Deer
Privately Owned or Leased Land Only

Unantlered
Deer
Open Permit- Public Land (Except National Forest Service Land)


Special
Muzzleloader
Privately Owned or Leased Land Only Stalk Hunting Only
(No Dogs)

Bow and Arrow and Spear
Stalk Hunting Only
(No Dogs)
Autauga Nov. 22- Jan.15

Jan. 16- Jan.31
Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Baldwin Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Barbour Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Bibb (1)(3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Blount Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-
Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17- Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Bullock Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Butler (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Calhoun (3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Chambers (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Cherokee No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Chilton (1)(3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Choctaw Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Clarke Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.12-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Clay (3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Cleburne (3) No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Coffee (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Colbert Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Conecuh Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Coosa (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Covington (1(2))(3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Crenshaw (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Cullman Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.7 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Jan.8- Jan.24 Oct.15- Jan.31
Dale (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Dallas (3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
DeKalb No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Elmore (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Escambia (2) (3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Etowah Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Fayette (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Franklin (3) No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Geneva (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Greene (1)(2) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Hale (1)(3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Henry (1) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Houston No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Jackson No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Jefferson Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.7 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Jan.8- Jan.24 Oct.15- Jan.31
Lamar No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Lauderdale No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.7 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Jan.8- Jan.24 Oct.15- Jan.31
Lawrence (3) No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.7 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Jan.8- Jan.24 Oct.15- Jan.31
Lee Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Limestone No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.7 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Jan.8- Jan.24 Oct.15- Jan.31
Lowndes Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Macon (2)(3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Madison No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.7 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Jan.8- Jan.24 Oct.15- Jan.31
Marengo Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Marion No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Marshall No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Mobile Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Monroe Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Montgomery Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Morgan No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-
Jan.7 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Jan.8- Jan.24 Oct.15- Jan.31
Perry (1)(3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Pickens (1)(2) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Pike Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Randolph No Dog Season Nov.22- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Russell Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Shelby Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.7 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Jan.8- Jan.24 Oct.15- Jan.31
St.Clair Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Sumter (2) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Talladega (3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Tallapoosa Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Tuscaloosa (1)(3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Walker Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21
Oct.15- Jan.31
Washington Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31
Wilcox Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov. 22- Jan.31 Dec.20- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.16 Oct.15- Jan.31
Winston (1)(3) Nov. 22- Jan.15 Jan. 16- Jan.31 Nov.22-Jan.31 Dec.27- Jan.1 Nov.17-Nov.21 Oct.15- Jan.31



(1)DOG DEER HUNTING EXCEPTIONS:
Dog Deer Hunting is closed in Chambers; Coosa; Covington, (north of U.S. Hwy 84); Geneva; and Henry Counties except by special permit from department. Individual property owners in Chambers and Coosa counties may hunt with dogs on their own property without special permit. No dog deer hunting allowed on Open Permit-Public Land.

By Stalk Hunting Only:
Bibb, Chilton, and Perry: That area of Bibb, Chilton, and Perry east of Alabama Hwy. 219, south of U.S. Hwy. 82 and north of Alabama Hwy. 183.
Butler: south of Alabama Hwy. 106 and east of I-65.
Coffee: that area inside the following boundaries, State Hwy. 134 from the Covington County Line, east to County Road 460, south to the Geneva County line, east to the Dale County Line, north to state Hwy. 134, west to State Hwy. 84 west to the Covington County Line.
Crenshaw: that area inside the following boundaries, from the east city limit of Luverne, U.S. Hwy. 29 east to the junction of County Road 57, County Road 57 south to the junction of Davis Road, Davis Road west to County Road 41, County Road 41 south to U.S. Hwy. 331, U.S. Hwy. 331 north to County Road 41, County Road 41 north to County Road 39, County Road 39 north to the Luverne city limit.
Dale: that area east of Judy Creek from Barbour County line to where it intersects Dale County road 36 and at the area of Dale County road 36 to Alabama Hwy. 27 to the Henry County line.
Elmore: That area of Elmore, east of U.S. Hwy. 231, south of Alabama Hwy. 14, west of Tumkeehatchee Creek and north of the Tallapoosa River.
Fayette: that area west of US Hwy. 43 and north of Alabama Hwy. 18
Hale and Perry: that area inside the following boundaries, from County Road 32 at the Hale County Line, west to the intersection of State Highway 25, State Highway 25 north until it intersects with the Talladega National Forest boundary, following the boundary south until it intersects the Perry County line, following the National Forest boundary east to Perry County Road 23 to the intersection with Perry County Road 29, south to Morgan Springs, west on the Perry County Road known as Morgan Springs Road, to the Hale County line.
Greene, Pickens and Tuscaloosa: that area inside the following boundaries, in Pickens County from the intersection of US Highway 82 and County Road 63 south on County Road 63 to Benevola, County Road 2 (commonly known as the Romulus Road) east through Greene County to US Highway 82 in Tuscaloosa County.
Tuscaloosa: that area north of US Highway 82
Winston: That area east of Hwy. 5 from Walker County line to Natural Bridge and all that area north of Hwy. 278.

(2)MUZZLELOADER:
U.S. Corps of Engineers Lands in Greene; Pickens; and Sumter counties Nov.17 - 21 and Jan.12 - 31. Conecuh National Forest Service Lands, except Blue Springs Wildlife Mgmt. Areas, in Covington & Escambia counties Nov. 17-21 and Tuskegee National Forest in Macon county Nov. 17-21.

(3) NATIONAL FOREST SERVICE LANDS, except Wildlife Mgmt. areas

Dog or Stalk Hunting

Antlered Bucks
Stalk Hunting Only (No Dogs or Buckshot)

Unantlered
Deer

Bow and Arrow and Spear
Stalk Hunting Only
(No Dogs)
Bibb
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.24- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Calhoun
Nov.22- Jan.15

Jan. 16- Jan.31

Dec. 27-Jan. 1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Chilton
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.24- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Clay
Nov.22- Jan.15

Jan. 16- Jan.31

Dec. 27-Jan. 1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Cleburne
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec. 27-Jan. 1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Covington
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.17- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Dallas
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.24- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Escambia
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.17- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Franklin
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.27- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Hale
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.24- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Lawrence
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.27- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Macon
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.17- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Perry
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.24- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Talladega*
Nov.22- Jan.15

Jan. 16- Jan.31

Dec.27- Jan 1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Tuscaloosa
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.24- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31
Winston
No Dog Season

Nov. 22- Jan.31

Dec.27- Jan.1

Oct. 15 - Jan.31

* Closed on Tuesday and Wednesday, except Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 21-22, Dec 19-20 and Dec 26-27.

Back to Top

NOTICE: HUNTER ORANGE REQUIREMENTS FOR HUNTING
All persons hunting any wildlife species (except waterfowl, turkey, and mourning dove and while hunting legally designated species during legal nighttime hours) during dates and in areas open by regulation to gun deer season are required to wear an outer garment above the waist with a minimum of 144 square inches of hunter orange or either a full size hunter orange hat or cap. Hunters are not required to wear hunter orange when hunting from a stand elevated twelve (12) feet or more from the ground, when hunting in an enclosed box stand, when traveling in an enclosed vehicle, or when traveling on foot no more than twenty (20) feet directly between an operating enclosed vehicle and a stand where the hunter is exempt from the hunter orange requirement. The hunter orange must be worn when traveling on foot between an operating enclosed vehicle and exempt stand when the distance is more than a direct distance of twenty (20) feet. A small logo and/or printing is permitted on the front of hunter orange caps; otherwise, hunter orange must be of solid color and visible from any angle. Only hunter orange, commonly called blaze orange, ten-mile cloth, etc., is legal. The various shades of red as well as camo orange are not legal.

Back to Top

OPEN PERMIT - PUBLIC LAND

Open Permit-Public Land is defined as governmentally owned land open for public hunting and/or lands made available to the public on an individual basis whether for a fee or not. Examples of such lands would be National Forest Service Lands, lands owned by lumber companies and utility companies available for use by hunters either through free permits, fee permits or no permit requirement. This does not include Alabama's Wildlife Management Areas. See the 2008-09 Wildlife Management Area Schedule for information.

Back to Top

HUNTER SAFETY RECOMMENDATION

Many hunters travel to and from their hunting area, tree stand, or blind just before dawn and after dusk. It is recommended that hunters use a small pen light while traveling to and from their stands or hunting area. There is also a small red flashing light that can be purchased that pins to a hat or other visible area. Use of a small light will help with the problem of identification of hunters during low light condition. This recommendation does not legalize the use of lights to illegally hunt game animals.

Back to Top

Tree Stand Safety Recommendation:

Falls from tree stands are the most common hunting accidents. Serious injury and death are likely to occur from such a fall. It is strongly recommended that no one hunt from an elevated stand without using a safety harness


TURKEY
Gobblers Only - One a day, Five During Combined Fall and Spring Seasons. Special youth hunt, Saturday and Sunday prior to the opening of the spring season. SPECIAL DISABLED HUNT ONE DAY PRIOR TO ALL OPENING DAYS. Participants must meet medical requirements. See website for information www.outdooralabama.com.

FALL SEASON: Clarke; Clay; Covington; Monroe; Randolph; and Talladega November 22- January 1
No decoys permitted during fall turkey season.

SPRING SEASON: Autuaga; Baldwin; Barbour; Bibb; Bount; Bullock; Butler; Calhoun; Chambers; Clark; Clay; Cherokee; Chilton; Choctaw; Cleburne; Coffee; Conecuh; Coosa; Covington; Crenshaw; Cullman (see exception below); Dale; Dallas; DeKalb; Elmore; Escambia; Etowah; Fayette; Geneva (except south of Hwy. 52, east of Hwy. 167, west of Houston County line and north of the Florida line); Greene; Hale; Henry, Houston; Jackson; Jefferson; Lamar; Lee; Lowndes; Macon; Marengo; Marion; Marshall; Mobile (except south of Interstate 10 from the Mississippi state line east to Alabama Hwy. 188 and south on Alabama Hwy. 188 to Coden, Alabama); Monroe; Montgomery; Perry; Pickens; Pike; Randolph; Russell; Shelby; St. Clair; Sumter; Tallageda; Tallapoosa; Tuscaloosa; Walker; Washington; and Wilcox. March 16 - April 30

Cullman: Closed north of Lewis Smith Lake and north of Cullman County Hwy. 437 and west of Interstate 65.

Colbert; Franklin; Lauderdale, West of U.S. Hwy 43; Lawrence, south of Alabama Hwy. 24; Limestone, north of U.S. Hwy 72; Madison; and Winston
April 1- April 30

Lawrence, north and east of Hwy. 157 and west of Hwy. 33 and south of Hwy. 20
April 21- April 25

Morgan County is not open to Turkey Hunting west of Interstate 65. Restocking efforts are underway.

Back to Top


MOURNING DOVE

SOUTH ZONE: Baldwin; Barbour; Coffee; Covington; Dale; Escambia; Geneva; Henry; Houston; and Mobile.

12 a Day - 12 in Possession in South Zone (70 days)
Split Season October 4- November 2
November 27 - November 30
December 6 - January 10

Shooting Hours:
12 O’clock noon until Sunset (Afternoon Shooting Only) October 4
One-half hour before Sunrise until Sunset (All Day) October 5- November 2
One-half hour before Sunrise until Sunset (All Day) November 27 - November 30
One-half hour before Sunrise until Sunset (All Day) December 6 - January 10

NORTH ZONE: All counties except those listed above.

15 a Day - 15 in Possession in North Zone (60 Days)
Split Season September 13 - October 5
October 25- November 15
December 13 - December 27

Shooting Hours:
12 O’clock noon until Sunset (Afternoon Shooting Only) September 13
One-half hour before Sunrise until Sunset (All Day) September 14 - October 5
One-half hour before Sunrise until Sunset (All Day) October 25- November 15
One-half hour before Sunrise until Sunset (All Day) December 13 - December 27

Back to Top


BOBWHITE QUAIL

12 a Day - 12 in Possession November 15 - February 28
RABBIT
8 a Day - 8 in Possession October 1 - February 28

No running of dogs during daytime or after 3:00 A.M. during and in areas of spring turkey season.
SQUIRREL

8 a Day - 8 in Possession October 1 - February 28

Back to Top


RACCOON
5 Per Person - Private Owned and Leased Lands September 1 - February 28
5 Per Party - Open Permit - Public Land September 1 - February 28

No running of dogs during daytime or after 3:00 A.M. during and in areas of spring turkey season.
OPOSSUM
No Bag Limit September 1 - February 28

No running of dogs during daytime or after 3:00 A.M. during and in areas of spring turkey season.
FOX
1 a Day - 1 in Possession - Daylight Hours Only - Guns only in areas of and during dates of turkey and/or gun deer season. Bow and Arrow - in areas of and during dates of open bow and arrow seasons for deer and turkey.

DOGS ONLY - NO GUNS OR BOW AND ARROW OR CROSSBOW- No Closed Season except no running of dogs during daytime or after 3:00 A.M. during and in areas of spring turkey season.

Back to Top


BOBCAT
No Bag Limit - Daylight Hours Only - Guns only in areas of and during dates of turkey and/or gun deer season. Bow and Arrow - in areas of and during dates of open bow and arrow seasons for deer and turkey.
DOGS ONLY - NO GUNS OR BOW AND ARROW OR CROSSBOW- No Closed Season except no running of dogs during daytime or after 3:00 A.M. during and in areas of spring turkey season.
NOTE: See "Tagging Requirements" under trapping seasons.
COYOTE
GUNS AND BOW AND ARROW ONLY (NO DOGS)
No Bag Limit - No Closed Season. Daylight Hours Only.

GUNS, BOW AND ARROW AND CROSSBOW WITH DOGS - Only during daylight hours in areas of and during dog deer season.

DOGS ONLY - NO GUNS, BOW AND ARROW, OR CROSSBOW- No Closed Season except no running of dogs during daytime or after 3:00 A.M. during and in areas of spring turkey season.
BEAVER, NUTRIA, AND GROUNDHOG

No Bag Limit - Daylight Hours Only No Closed Season

Back to Top


STARLINGS, CROWS, AND BLACKBIRDS
No Bag Limit - Daylight Hours Only No Closed Season
FERAL SWINE (WILD HOGS)
GUNS, BOW AND ARROW, CROSSBOW, OR SPEARS (NO DOGS)*
No bag limit daylight hours onle. No Closed Season

GUNS, BOW AND ARROW, CROSSBOW OR SPEARS WITH DOGS*
No bag limit, daylight hours only - No Closed Season, except during and in areas of stalk only
deer season which includes counties and areas listed under the dog deer hunting exceptions
(see page 5) and except during and in areas of spring turkey season.

DOGS ONLY- NIGHTTIME (NO WEAPONS)*
No bag limit - No closed season, except after 3:00 A.M. during and in areas of spring turkey season.

TRAPPING BY LANDOWNER OR HIS AGENT
No bag limit - No Closed Season *No hunting on Tuesdays and Wednesdays on the Talladega (Talladega Division) National Forest during the dates of the deer season except hunting shall be allowed on November 20 -21,
December 18- 19, and December 25 - 26.

Once reduced to personal possession of the landowner or agent, feral swine will no longer be considered a game animal. However, feral swine will be treated as a game animal at any time they are hunted.
BEAR, MOUNTAIN LION, ALLIGATOR AND RUFFED GROUSE
No Open Season
ALLIGATOR
By Special Permit Only Must register on-line at www.outdooralabama.com between June 2 (8:00 a.m.) and July 17 (8:00 a.m.). 140 permits will be drawn (100 Delta and 40 Eufaula)
Mobile Delta August 15 - August 18
August 22 - August 25
Lake Eufaula (Walter F. George) August 21 - August 24
WOODCOCK
3 a Day - 6 in Possession December 18 - January 31
Shooting Hours - One-half hour before Sunrise to Sunset.
SNIPE

8 a Day - 16 in Possession November 14 - February 28
Shooting Hours - One-half hour before Sunrise to Sunset.

Back to Top


RAIL, PURPLE GALLINULE AND COMMON MOORHENS
15 a Day - 15 in Possession Contingent upon Federal Register
Shooting Hours - One-half hour before Sunrise to Sunset.
SPECIAL TEAL SEASON
4 a Day - 8 in possession - Contingent upon Federal Register
Shooting Hours - One-half hour before Sunrise to Sunset.
SPECIAL EARLY CANADA GOOSE SEASON
5 a Day - 10 in possession Contingent upon Federal Register
Shooting Hours - One-half hour before Sunrise to Sunset.
*DUCK, COOT, MERGANSER

Contingent upon Federal Register
Shooting Hours - One-half hour before Sunrise to Sunset.

Back to Top


GEESE

Statewide (except Southern James Bay Population SJBP Zone)

All Geese: Contingent upon Federal Register
Southern James Bay Population SJBP Zone - that portion of Limestone County south of U.S. Hwy 72; that portion of Morgan County east of U.S. Hwy 31, north of State Hwy. 36, and west of U.S. Hwy 231; and that portion of Madison County south of Swancott Road and west of Triana Road)

Canada Geese: Contingent upon Federal Register

Other Geese: Contingent upon Federal Register

The daily bag limit of 5 shall not include more than 2 Canada geese or 2 white-fronted geese. The possession limit of 5 shall include no more than 4 Canada geese and white-fronted geese in aggregate.

Shooting Hours - One-half hour before Sunrise to Sunset.
*SPECIAL YOUTH WATERFOWL HUNTING DAYS

Contingent upon Federal Register
Same shooting hours, bag limits, and legal arms and ammunition apply as did in regular waterfowl season.
TRAPPING

BOBCAT, SPOTTED SKUNK (CIVET CAT), COYOTE, FOX, MINK, MUSKRAT, NUTRIA, OPOSSUM, OTTER, RACCOON AND SKUNK: November 15 - February 20

BEAVER: No Closed Season

COYOTE: No Closed Trapping Season on Private Lands with Landowner Permission

NOTE: All bobcat and otter, regardless of method of harvest, are required to be tagged by a representative of the Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division within 13 days of harvest or may be left with a taxidermist with a completed tagging form, and the taxidermist is required to have the bobcat or otter tagged within 13 days of receipt.

Back to Top


LEGAL ARMS AND AMMUNITION FOR HUNTING

FULLY AUTOMATIC FIREARMS AND/OR SILENCED FIREARMS PROHIBITED.

GENERAL PROHIBITIONS: It shall be unlawful for any person to use any method or have in their possession any weapon or ammunition contrary to this regulation while hunting or attempting to hunt game birds and animals or other species provided for herein unless expressly provided for by duly enacted laws of the State of Alabama. It shall be unlawful for any person to refuse to submit firearms and ammunition or any device, instrument or accessory used in hunting to Conservation Officers for inspection. It shall be unlawful for any person to hunt with a bow or gun that has a light source attached that is capable of casting a beam of light (including a laser sight) forward of said bow or gun or to possess such a light source adapted for attachment to said bow or gun while hunting. It shall be unlawful to possess any equipment that uses electronics to increase the ability to see in the dark (night vision equipment) while hunting any species of wildlife, both protected or unprotected species. It shall be unlawful to possess fully automatic firearms or silenced firearms while hunting any species of wildlife.

DEER: WHEN AND WHERE DOG OR STALK HUNTING IS ALLOWED -Rifles using centerfire, mushrooming ammunition. Shotguns, 10 gauge or smaller using buckshot, slugs, or single round ball. Muzzle-loaders and Black Powder Handguns--.40 caliber or larger, provided further it shall be illegal to possess other firearms while hunting with muzzleloaders during the special muzzleloader season. Long bows, compound bows, or crossbows. Handguns or pistols using centerfire, mushrooming ammunition.

WHEN AND WHERE STALK HUNTING ONLY IS ALLOWED - Same as above, except slugs or single round ball only may be used in shotguns.

TURKEY: Shotguns, 10 gauge or smaller using standard No. 2 shot or smaller. Long bows or compound bows (no crossbows). Handguns or pistols using centerfire mushrooming ammunition, black powder handguns or pistols .40 caliber or larger. Handguns or pistols can only have open metallic sights (no scopes). Nothing in this section is intended to prohibit the possession of rifles, shotgun/rifle combinations (drilling) or buckshot and slugs when the hunter is stalk hunting both deer and turkey provided no person shoots or attempts to shoot turkey with the rifle or shotgun using buckshot or slugs.

MIGRATORY BIRDS: Shotguns, 10 gauge or smaller, plugged with a one piece filler incapable of removal without disassembling the gun or otherwise incapable of holding more than 3 shells using standard No. 2 shot or smaller, except waterfowl must be hunted with steel shot only, T-size or smaller and waterfowl hunters shall not possess any other size steel shot or any size lead shot. Long bows, compound bows, or crossbows. Waterfowl may also be hunted with other shot compositions and shot sizes that are approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

BOBCAT AND GROUNDHOG AND UNPROTECTED WILDLIFE: Rifles of any caliber; handguns or pistols; shotguns, 10 gauge or smaller using standard No. 2 shot or smaller; long bows, crossbows or compound bows.

RACCOON AND OPOSSUM: Nighttime hunting -- Shotguns using No. 6 shot or smaller; .22 caliber rimfire firearms. (See "Other Game Birds or Animals" for daytime hunting.)

FOX, COYOTE AND FERAL SWINE: Rifles of any caliber. Handguns or pistols. Shotguns, 10 gauge or smaller. During stalk gun deer season only, no buckshot may be used in shotguns. Long bows, compound bows, or crossbows.

OTHER GAME BIRDS OR ANIMALS: Rifles using rimfire ammunition or those operated by air; muzzleloaders and blackpowder handguns of any calibur; long bows, crossbows or compound bows; shotguns, 10 gauge or smaller using standard No. 4 shot or smaller; handguns or pistols; blow guns using darts propelled by the hunters breath only; or sling shots.

SPEAR: DEER and FERAL SWINE may be taken by hand thrown spear during the open Bow and Arrow season on these species. The hand thrown spear shall have a sharpened blade a minimum of two inches in width. The spear shall only be hand thrown.
FOREST MANAGEMENT AND WILDLIFE RESOURCES

A general rule of wildlife management is that habitat diversity equals wildlife diversity and abundance. Food and cover requirements differ for every wildlife species, and vary seasonally for a given species. Habitat diversity is necessary to supply the varied food and cover needs of wild animals. Active forest management can simulate natural forces that result in diverse habitats.

In the natural process of plant succession, one type of habitat replaces another over time. Early succession habitats are characterized by plants that are prolific in growth. Weeds, grasses, vines, and shrubs rapidly occupy bare ground that is exposed to the sun. These plants grow profusely and produce tremendous amounts of seeds, fruits, forage and cover for various wildlife species. Without the occurrence of natural disturbance (such as high winds, wildfire, or floods) or active management (such as harvesting, thinning, or prescribed burning) early succession habitats are relatively shortlived.

If undisturbed, trees soon take over, and a site returns to forest. When mature, the forest ecosystem is very stable, but not very productive. It uses most of its energy just maintaining itself. Wildlife productivity is relatively low. Diverse habitats characterized by various ages and types of forest are most productive for wildlife.

Approximately two-thirds of Alabama is covered by some type of forest. These forests provide most of the habitat available for the state's wildlife resources. The composition and condition of these forests have a major influence on the quality of wildlife habitats and the wildlife species that occur. Alabama's land area is approximately 33 million acres. According to the latest forest statistics 22.9 million acres of this land area are forested. Upland hardwood is the most prevalent forest type, growing on 7.7 million acres and comprising 34 percent of the timberland. Planted pine forest is
established on 4.6 million acres, composing 20 percent of the forest land. Oak-pine forest occurs on 4.2 million acres and makes up 18 percent of the state's timberland. Natural pine accounts for 3.5 million acres and 15 percent of forest.

Of the pine types, about 1.0 million acres, or 4 percent of the timberlands, are longleaf-slash pine forest. Lowland hardwood forest is found on 2.9 million acres and is 13 percent of the forest. Non-industrial private landowners own 79 percent of the state's forest land, forest industry owns 16 percent, and 5 percent is public owned forest.

Almost half of Alabama's forests are hardwood types such as oak, hickory and gum. Although hardwoods are bundant, all of this forest is not high quality wildlife habitat. Over the years, some of the best trees for timber and wildlife were removed. The most valuable hardwoods for wildlife are the oaks, because of the mast they produce. When these forests are managed with periodic thinning and other practices that favor oaks, mast production and future oak regeneration are enhanced.

Mast-producing hardwoods are important to wildlife, but only provide part of the habitat requirements of most species. Deer, for example, feed heavily on acorns in fall and winter but need succulent sprouts, herbaceous forage and fruits in other seasons. These food sources are deficient in mature hardwood forests, but are abundant in clearcuts and young forests. Well distributed clearcuts create early succession habitats that provide an abundance of seeds, fruits, forage, and cover for various wildlife.

Pine forest makes up more than one-third of the state's timberland. Managed pine forests can provide excellent wildlife habitat and allow for more wildlife management opportunities than hardwood forest. Periodic thinning of pines improves growing conditions for the trees that remain and contributes to forest health. Opening the forest canopy permits more sunlight to reach the forest floor. This stimulates lush new growth of a variety of plants that many wild animals use for food and cover.

Wildfire can be destructive to forests and wildlife, but fire can also be a renewing force to improve wildlife habitats when properly applied. Prescribed fire applied to create a patchwork of burned and unburned areas stimulates productive new plant growth while retaining adequate cover for wildlife. Fire has played an influencing role in the development of some ecosystems and associated wildlife. Longleaf pine forests were dominant across the southeastern coastal plain before European settlement. They were a result of natural fire events and the use of fire by native cultures.
The frequency and intensity of fire sustained an open canopy forest with a diverse groundcover of native grasses, wildflowers, and shrubs. Wildlife was abundant and thriving in this system.

Current conservation efforts to restore fire dependent ecosystems such as longleaf pine have the potential to increase suitable habitat for a number of declining wildlife species and improve habitat quality for other wildlife.
Many species of wildlife benefit from well-planned forest management activities.

Understanding this relationship is critical to the joined management of forests and the wildlife
resources that use them.

Back to Top




WHITE-TAILED DEER

Alabama's white-tailed deer herd is a tremendous resource. It offers aesthetic, consumptive, recreational, and economic value. Properly managing that resource is vitally important.

It is the responsibility of hunters, clubs, and landowners to establish objectives to manage the deer on the property hunted. Alabama's current deer season structure allows landowners, hunting clubs, and deer managers great flexibility in how they manage deer on their property. The long, liberal season enables landowners and deer managers to be as aggressive or conservative with their management program as they want, but does not unreasonably restrict harvest
opportunities for the individual hunter. It does not mean that you should, even if it were actually possible, harvest a deer every day of the season. It does mean you should exercise good judgment when making harvest decisions. This approach should appeal to all deer hunters, regardless of their experience level or deer management objectives.

Back to Top
Three Buck Limit Continues for the 2008-09 Hunting Season

The 2007-08 hunting season marked the implementation of statewide buck harvest limits for the first time in several decades. Again, this season, hunters will be limited to a season bag limit of 3 bucks. One of the three bucks must have at least 4 points (one inch or longer) on one main antler beam. While current buck harvest trends may be appropriate on a site specific basis, these restrictions are intended to moderate overall statewide buck harvest levels. Primary objectives of this approach are to reduce the annual statewide buck harvest and, ultimately, to ensure that yearling bucks make up no more than one-third of the total statewide antlered buck harvest.

Expected benefits of this new regulation include improved adult buck to doe ratios and improved buck age structure. Other expected benefits include improved herd health indices such as a more timely and intensified breeding period; increased antlerless deer harvest; and an improved hunting experience.

Public support of and enthusiasm for the new limit must be tempered with realistic expectations. This limit will not ensure that every hunter has equal opportunity for harvesting a high quality buck. Habitat quality, land base, and deliberate management efforts are much more consistent and far-reaching producers of high quality bucks than are simple regulations alone. The impact of the new buck limit on Alabama's deer herd is unclear at this time. It will take several years of gathering data to properly assess what affect this regulation has produced. Much of the success or failure of these new buck limits will depend on how Alabama's deer hunters respond to these regulations and associated harvest validation requirements. All deer hunters are required to complete the buck harvest validation as described in another section of this publication. The 2008-09 hunting license contains a validation section that deer hunters are required to complete upon the harvest of any buck.

The Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries remains committed to its educational approach to managing deer harvest across Alabama. Hunters should continue to be selective regarding the bucks they choose to harvest and should do their part to ensure an appropriate doe harvest. The new buck limits represent a maximum limit that attempts to address a wide spectrum of deer management and hunter satisfaction needs. For this approach to be successful,
hunters and deer managers must not view this limit as a quota or harvest goal to be pursued each year. For many years the DWFF has consistently encouraged deer hunters not to measure success by the number of bucks they harvested. Likewise, the DWFF encourages all hunters not to measure a successful deer season based on achieving a season limit of bucks.
F ACTS ABOUT BUCK HARVEST

* Antler development in yearling bucks is not a reliable predictor of genetic potential for antler
size in Alabama. There are other factors such as habitat quality and maternal condition
through weaning that influence antler development in yearling males. In Alabama, birth date
significantly influences both antler size and body weights in yearling bucks.
* When using antler based criteria to exclude younger bucks from harvest, main beam length
and inside spread are usually much better indicators of age than antler points for bucks 2½
years old and older.
* Bucks only exhibit approximately 10% of their antler growth potential at 1½ years old and
approximately 40% of their potential at 2½ years old. Most bucks do not approach 100% of
their antler growth potential until they reach 5½ years of age or older.
* The three primary factors that influence antler development in white-tailed deer are age,
nutrition, and genetics. Of these three, age and to a lesser extent proper habitat management
that provides adequate nutrition are more controllable by deer hunters/managers. Age is
directly affected by a hunter's decision to shoot or not shoot. Basically, DEAD DEER DON'T
GROW!
* Passing up yearling bucks and 2½ year old bucks ensures a substantial number of bucks will
reach maturity. The proportion of bucks in each age class is known as the buck age structure of the
herd. Buck age structure strongly influences breeding behaviors and overall reproductive health.
* There are many benefits to managing a deer herd for a well-proportioned buck age structure
and a balanced adult sex-ratio regardless of habitat quality or land size. These include a short,
intense breeding season, improved reproductive health, and deer density appropriate for the
available habitat. In short, hunters can expect a normally functioning deer herd and a quality
hunting experience.

F ACTS ABOUT DOE HARVEST

* In most situations, any doe regardless of age is a candidate for harvest. The key is to positively
identify the deer as a doe and not a young, unantlered buck before pulling the trigger.
* The quickest way to address overpopulation and unbalanced sex-ratios is through doe harvest.
Bucks-only harvest allows taking of only approximately 15% of the fall population, while
goal oriented either-sex harvest allows taking of 30-40% or more of the fall population.
* Does usually begin reproducing at 1½ years of age. Healthy does will produce fawns each
year until they die. So called "barren does" mostly occur in deer herds in poor health.
* In a healthy, managed deer herd, 30-40% of the total deer population can be removed each
year without a reduction in total deer numbers in subsequent years. In fact, a goal oriented
either-sex harvest approach provides the greatest harvest opportunity while maintaining the
deer density in balance with the existing habitat conditions.
* 50 healthy adult does (2½ years old and older) produce more fawns than 100 adult does in
poor health.
* Balanced adult sex-ratios promote earlier and more compressed breeding and fawning
periods when combined with a normal buck age structure. Most does are bred on their first
estrous cycles and consequently, most fawns are born during the same two to three week
period.
* Killing adult does is easy - UNTIL YOU TRY IT! Sufficient doe harvest that maintains a
balanced sex-ratio year after year can be challenging. Management of the unantlered segment
of a deer herd is often the most effective and least utilized tool at the disposal of the deer
manager. It is important to establish a harvest goal for does and stick to it.

Steps to Developing a Deer Management Plan

Interest in deer management has grown significantly during the last few years. As a result,
an increasing number of hunting clubs and landowners are implementing new deer management
programs on their properties. The following steps will help minimize the headaches
experienced when managing a deer herd.

* Assess the condition of the deer herd by evaluating deer kill and hunter observation data.
* Evaluate habitat quality and determine the limiting factors for the property.
* Establish realistic goals, both short and long term, for the numbers and/or size of deer to be
killed, as well as the time frame in which these goals are to be achieved.
* Initiate practices to improve deer herd and habitat deficiencies.
* Monitor progress by collecting and analyzing deer kill and hunter observation data.
* Contact the nearest ADWFF office to talk to a wildlife biologist in your area. They can help
with developing a deer management plan for properties in Alabama. More information on
developing a deer management plan also can be found at www.outdooralabama.com.
ADAPTIVE HUNTING

If there is only one bit of advice deer hunters should take to heart, it is to hunt where the deer are rather than where they want the deer to be. More often than not, rainy summers make it a good year to be a deer, but a bad year to be a deer hunter. Failure to adapt to deer movement and feeding patterns affected by abundant rainfall causes some hunters to believe there is a serious decline in deer numbers in their area. Wet growing seasons generally produce abundant natural forage and good acorn crops. Deer movement can be very limited when natural forage and acorns are abundant. Deer spend very little time, if any, in and around food plots under these conditions. To be successful, hunters must spend more time hunting where the natural browse and acorns are located, or along travel routes leading to and from these feeding areas. Hunting food plots early in the season is often a frustrating experience following a wet summer. Deer usage of food plots increases as acorns and/or browse becomes scarce, making these areas good late-season hunting spots. Hunting food plots during a hunting season following a droughty summer can produce a banner year for deer sightings and harvests. Knowing the "when's" and "where's" of hunting a property makes for a more enjoyable hunting experience. Deer always adapt to their circumstances - hunters should too.
ANTLERED BUCK AND TURKEY HARVEST RECORD

A mandatory hunter harvest record is in effect this season. It is illegal for a hunter to field dress or move an antlered buck or turkey before dating a hunter harvest record. (see example below) this record will be provided on all licenses. For license exempt or lifetime license hunters, a sample form is provided below. The harvest record must be in possession everytime a person is hunting deer or turkey. It is unlawful to utilize or possess more than one harvest record.

If someone other than the hunter is transporting a harvested antlered buck or turkey, the individual transporting the antlered buck or turkey MUST have in their possession written documentation including name, address, license
number (if applicable), telephone number, date of harvest and signature of the person who harvested the antlered buck or turkey, until it is processed and stored in a cooler or freezer at one's residence or delivered to a commercial processing plant. (Click here for a pdf copy)

FORMS MUST INCLUDE THIS INFORMATION:

Name _________________________
License No. (if applicable)_____________________
Antlered Buck Harvest Record

Record before field dressing or moving carcass
Antlered Buck _____/_____/_____ (date of harvest)
Antlered Buck _____/_____/_____ (date of harvest)
Antlered Buck - 4 pts, 1” or longer, on one antler _____/_____/_____ (date of harvest)

Turkey Harvest Record

____/____/____ ____/____/____ ____/____/____ ____/____/____ ____/____/____
(date of harvest) (date of harvest) (date of harvest) (date of harvest) (date of harvest)


Back to Top

HARVEST MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR ALABAMA DEER HUNTERS

Regardless of the size of your hunting lands, there are some basic principles of deer harvest management every hunter/manager should know. Educating and informing the hunting public should compel individual hunters to make good deer harvest decisions. Good harvest management is the key to improving and maintaining healthy, balanced deer populations across Alabama. Before you harvest a deer this season, consider for a moment the effects of your decision. Will harvesting or not harvesting a particular deer ultimately be beneficial or detrimental to the deer herd in your area? Remember every individual decision made by every individual hunter works to shape our deer herd. This season, do your part to promote sound deer management by making good harvest decisions. The following information and guidelines will help you get started.

Back to Top


FACTS ABOUT BUCK HARVEST

* Most experienced deer hunters should be willing to pass up younger bucks. In the case of young or inexperienced deer hunters, some limited harvest of younger bucks is acceptable.
* Antler development in yearling bucks is not a reliable predictor of genetic potential for antler size in Alabama. There are other factors such as habitat quality and maternal condition through weaning that influence antler development in yearling males. In Alabama, birth date significantly influences both antler size and body weights in yearling bucks.
* When using antler based criteria to exclude younger bucks from harvest, main beam length and inside spread are usually much better indicators of age than antler points for bucks 21/2 years old and older.
* Bucks only exhibit approximately 10% of their antler growth potential at 11/2 years old and approximately 40% of their potential at 21/2 years old. Most bucks do not approach 100% of their antler growth potential until they reach 51/2 years of age or older.
* The three primary factors that influence antler development in white-tailed deer are age, nutrition, and genetics. Of these three, age and to a lesser extent nutrition are more controllable by deer hunters/managers. Age is directly effected by a hunter’s decision to shoot or not shoot. Basically, DEAD DEER DON’T GROW!
* Not all habitats in Alabama produce deer of similar quality. Poorer quality habitats do not have the nutritional levels necessary for deer to grow as large or produce as many fawns as they can on better quality habitats. Habitat quality is directly related to soil fertility and/or availability of nutritious foods.
* Passing up yearling bucks and 21/2 year old bucks ensures a substantial number of bucks will reach maturity. The proportion of bucks in each age class is known as the buck age structure of the herd. Buck age structure strongly influences breeding behaviors and overall reproductive health.
* A normal or well-proportioned buck age structure is characterized by a significant number of 21/2 years old and older bucks. When combined with balanced adult sex ratios, normal buck age structure promotes earlier and more compressed breeding and fawning periods. Breeding behaviors, such as rubbing, scraping, fighting, and chasing, also are much more prolific and pronounced.
* Regardless of habitat quality or land size, there are still many benefits to managing a deer herd for a well-proportioned buck age structure and a balanced adult sex ratio. These include a short, intense breeding season, improved reproductive health, and deer density appropriate for the available habitat. In short, hunters can expect a normally functioning deer herd and a quality hunting experience.

Back to Top


FACTS ABOUT DOE HARVEST

* In most situations, any doe regardless of age is a candidate for harvest. The key is to positively identify the deer as a doe and not a young, unantlered buck before pulling the trigger.
* The quickest way to address overpopulation and unbalanced sex ratios is through doe harvest. Bucks-only harvest allows taking of only approximately 15% of the fall population, while goal oriented either-sex harvest allows taking of 30-40% or more of the fall population.
* Does usually begin reproducing at 11/2 years of age. Healthy does will produce fawns each year until they die. So called “barren does” mostly occur in deer herds in poor health.
* In a healthy, managed deer herd, 30-40% of the total deer population can be removed each year without a reduction in total deer numbers in subsequent years. In fact, a goal oriented either-sex harvest approach provides the greatest harvest opportunity while maintaining the deer density in balance with the existing habitat conditions.
* 50 healthy adult does (21/2 years old and older) will produce more fawns than 100 adult does in poor health.
* 50 Healthy Does
· 50 does with 2 fawns each =
· 100 fawns dropped
· 85% survived
· 85 new fawns recruited
· (43 male & 42 female)
* 100 Unhealthy Does
· 100 does with 1.3 fawn each =
· 130 fawns produced
· 50% survived (maybe)
· 65 new fawns recruited
· (32 male & 33 female)
* Most areas of Alabama have poor buck age structures and unbalanced adult sex ratios. By choosing to pass up a younger buck and harvest a doe instead, a hunter takes a step toward correcting both problems.
* A healthy, mature doe will usually render as much or more meat when processed as a 11/2 year old buck.
* Long breeding and fawning seasons are characteristic of deer herds with unbalanced sex-ratios. In such situations, does are bred on their second, third, or later estrous cycles. This results in spotted fawns in the woods almost the entire year.
* When combined with a normal buck age structure, balanced adult sex-ratios promote earlier and more compressed breeding and fawning periods. Most does are bred on their first estrous cycles and consequently, most fawns are born during the same two to three week period.
* Many hunters become concerned after a few years of either-sex harvest because doe sightings may decline. They fear they have drastically reduced deer numbers and many are reluctant to continue with the doe harvest. In actuality, the lack of doe sightings is almost always a result of increased hunting pressure and the subsequent education of the surviving does. A 5/2 year old doe on a property with a history of aggressive doe harvest can be just as difficult to kill as a 5/2 year old buck on a property with a history of heavy buck hunting pressure.
* Harvesting adult does is easy - UNTIL YOU TRY IT! Sufficient doe harvest that maintains a balanced sex-ratio year after year can be challenging. Management of the unantlered segment of a deer herd is often the most effective and least utilized tool at the disposal of the deer manager. Overharvest of adult does in southeastern habitats by legal means has yet to be identified as a problem.

Back to Top
TEST YOUR DEER KNOWLEDGE
1. True or False: The number of antler points is an accurate indicator of a buck’s age.
2. True or False: A “yearling” deer is an animal that is one year old or younger.
3. True or False: Fawns lose their spots when they are 3-4 months old.
4. True or False: Most fawns are weaned when they are about 4 months old.
5. True or False: Most bucks produce their largest set of antlers at 3/2 years of age.
6. True or False: Spike-antlered yearling bucks are inferior for the trait of antler development.
7. True or False: Corn is a good source of protein and helps bucks grow larger antlers.
8. True or False: Deer can see colors in much the same way as humans.
9. True or False: A healthy adult doe (2/2 years or older) will usually give birth to twin fawns each year.
10. True or False: Yearling and fawn bucks are driven (dispersed) from their home range by older, more aggressive bucks.
11. True or False: Bucks usually shed their antlers in June and begin growing new antlers in July.
12. True or False: In most of Alabama, most does are bred in January and drop their fawns in late July through mid-August.
13. True or False: On average, a single deer will consume 4-6 pounds of food per day.

ANSWERS TO THE TEST YOUR DEER KNOWLEDGE QUIZ
1. False: Outside the yearling age class, there is often little difference in the average number of points among different age classes of bucks.
2. False: A yearling deer is an animal that is at least one year old but not older than 2 years of age. The terms “yearling” and “fawn” are not synonymous.
3. True
4. True
5. False: Most bucks produce their largest set of antlers between 5/2-7/2 years of age.
6. False: Many factors determine the size of a buck’s first antlers. In Alabama, birth date has a significant effect on yearling antler size.
7. False: Although highly preferred by deer, corn is low in protein and high in carbohydrates. Protein is essential for developing larger antlers.
8. False: Deer see colors much like a human that is red-green colorblind. Contrary to what some may believe, deer cannot see hunter orange.
9. True
10. False: Dispersal in yearling and fawn bucks is primarily the result of being driven away by their mothers.
11. False: In most of Alabama, bucks shed their antlers in March and begin growing new antlers by May.
12. True
13. True


Back to Top


STEPS TO DEVELOPING A
DEER MANAGEMENT PLAN
Interest in deer management has grown significantly during the last few years. As a result, an increasing number of hunting clubs and landowners are implementing new deer management programs on their properties. Most sportsmen undertake these new approaches to deer management because they are looking for something better. They want a healthier deer herd, more adult bucks, and/or a better quality hunting experience. Unfortunately, many of these programs are doomed for failure from the start. The primary reason for most failures is the lack of a plan detailing how to achieve the desired objectives. Taking time to develop a sound deer management plan will minimize the headaches experienced when managing a deer herd.

Evaluate the Herd and Habitat - An assessment of both the habitat and deer herd must be made before an appropriate deer management plan can be developed. Collecting deer harvest and observational data provides insight into the condition of the deer herd. An assessment of habitat quality shows what components of the habitat are limiting. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the management practices needed to achieve success. Furthermore, it is impossible to assess the program’s progress in future years.

Establish Realistic Goals - Once assessments of both the herd and the habitat have been made, short- and long-term goals should be established. These goals should focus on the numbers and/or size of deer to be harvested, as well as the time frame in which these goals are to be achieved. Too often hunting clubs begin a deer management program with unrealistic expectations. Participants do not fully understand the many limiting factors ultimately determining the level of success they achieve. Due to the lack of understanding and frustration associated with unrealistic expectations, many individuals give up after a short time. Understanding the limitations up front and developing an appropriate management plan will reduce the number of future disappointments.

Perhaps the most common cause of disappointment and frustration in a deer management program is unrealistic expectations of the size and/or number of harvested bucks. Hunting magazines and videos bombard deer hunters with images of huge whitetail bucks (150+ Boone & Crockett points) harvested from the midwestern U.S., Canadian provinces, and Texas. Hunters see and read about these huge deer and have visions of regularly killing similar-sized bucks on their property in Alabama. Several deer of this quality are killed in Alabama each year, but hunters should not expect to kill bucks of this size in large quantities, on a regular basis, or in all parts of Alabama. By gathering the necessary data beforehand, hunters can establish attainable goals for
__________________
caglezxj is offline   Reply With Quote
Remove Ads
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   RangerForums.net - Polaris Ranger Forum > Trail Riding and Hunting Section > Hunting Land and Leases


Search tags for this page

alabama hunting moorhen

,

conecuh national forest either sex hunting season

,

metal detectng tuscaloosa county greene hale

,

talladega hunting accessory us

,

tuskegee national forest hunting hogs

,

when is coyote season open in cullman county in alabama

Click on a term to search for related topics.

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wolf hunting ELK_HUN10 North West Chapter 28 12-27-2013 12:04 AM
06 Ranger 500 EFI problem while elk hunting, please help kmcgill Full Size Ranger Discussion 0 10-17-2010 06:37 PM
" Wanted " Hunting North Alabama caglezxj Hunting Land and Leases 1 08-24-2008 04:48 PM
Riding Otter Bob's Hunting Club MyHoundWillFindU South Chapter 2 02-08-2008 11:03 AM
NEW MEMBER IN ALABAMA teamsos New Members 6 01-26-2008 07:18 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:35 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.