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post #1 of 29 Old 10-01-2019, 12:01 PM Thread Starter
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looking at a used EV

Hi, New to the forum. I'm looking at a used 2015 Ranger-EV. Is there a way to tell how much life is left in the batteries. It has 318 hours on it. I'm guessing everything is original. It looks in real good shape. Any other item I should look at that might cost a lot to replace? How much do new batteries run? Thanks for any info.
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post #2 of 29 Old 10-01-2019, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Tundraman View Post
Any other item I should look at that might cost a lot to replace?
Check how rotten are the battery trays and/or frame around battery compartment.


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How much do new batteries run? Thanks for any info.
Recycle them, and replace with 14 Nissan Leaf G2 modules.
About $1100 for the modules (https://www.techdirectclub.com/nissa...f-14-w-option/), and about $200 for BMS (https://zeva.com.au/index.php?product=135). May need to add another contactor, so like $50 more.

Last edited by cricketo; 10-01-2019 at 03:51 PM.
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post #3 of 29 Old 10-02-2019, 04:55 AM
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Answering your question.
Check that the batteries are not overly swollen, a poor battery tends to have bulging sides.
Check each battery voltage when charged they should all be about the same ie 13+ volts depending on how long since they were charged, if there is a big difference in battery voltage that could be an issue.

When driven for say 30 mins, re check the battery voltages, if any are obviously low and well below 12v at rest they could be poor.
Check the electrolyte level, some later Trojans have a small dot and If I recall that should be showing white not black.

Look for any exceptional corrosion on the battery terminals. Also tighness.
If you have access to the kit and software for the Delta Q charger , you can see how many times its been charged, if any charges were aborted before completion. It gives an idea of how its been charged. Ie its only got 300hrs on the clock, but its had to be charged after every half hour to get there.

Get some form of guarantee from the seller.
If a vehicle is regularly used , ie a couple of hours each day, then my customers have been seeing about 1.5 to 2 years life. Others who use them a few hrs a week are seeing many years of use.

Lead acid seem to degenerate after about 500 cycles of charge discharge, if properly maintained. That also fits with my users experience when used daily.
Under the seat towards the centre back, is a round bodied contactor with two 5/16 posts. On this is a short harness connecting to a multiway plug, check its not burnt inside. In the same area is a small block of 3 fuses, on the end of a lead, may still be in a plastic cover, check the centre one isnt melty. Both thes issues are associated with the charger and high currents causing failures over time. Not a big deal but both can be a show stopper.
Check the CV and steering gaiters, as well as the suspension bushes.
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post #4 of 29 Old 10-02-2019, 07:51 AM
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Why does a aborted charge cycle matter? I have done this a bunch in the past if I just needed a partial charge to finish my day. Thoughts?


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post #5 of 29 Old 10-03-2019, 02:44 AM
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If there are high level of partial charges, that could suggest that the pack has not been given the chance to get balanced on a regular basis (Thats the point of the over charge stage at the end of the charge), That can mean that the pack isnt as overall charged as it could be. That may be sorted by a couple of full cycle chargers. It needs to be taken into context with the number of overall charge cycles. If its a high proportion of the charges are not being allowed to full cycle, that could mean that the weaker batteries have been pushed too low in use and may now not perform as well as they could all through their discharge cycle. The regular over charge also sort of protects the batteries that go high voltage(likely to be the waeaker ones), as it gets the whole pack to a more level voltage so one battery is not constantly going very high voltage .

A flag to check a bit further. Data really just adds to your understanding of what the pack is doing and how its been treated. But its really down to how the vehicle actually runs, and how its been maintained.
If buying a 2015 with original pack, I would assume that I would need to replace the pack in the near future, and factor that into my overall cost expectations.
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post #6 of 29 Old 10-03-2019, 08:32 AM
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Check each battery voltage when charged they should all be about the same ie 13+ volts depending on how long since they were charged, if there is a big difference in battery voltage that could be an issue.
Can you expand on "big difference in battery voltage"? I also bought an EV last spring and was told that the batteries were probably 2 years old, though I have been unable to verify that. So last month after I charged it, I took a look at the voltage levels. My highest came out at 12.68 and the lowest was 12.47. I figured that was fine, but then I started researching voltage levels and it seems 12.7 volts is considered 100% while 12.2 is 60% and time to charge it up again. Needless to say, I was surprised. So I began to wonder how much variation there should be between batteries.
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post #7 of 29 Old 10-03-2019, 10:25 AM Thread Starter
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looking at a uused EV

Might be a simple question. To measure battery voltage do I have to disconnect them all from each other and test each battery individually?
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post #8 of 29 Old 10-03-2019, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by PoppyDoodle View Post
Can you expand on "big difference in battery voltage"? I also bought an EV last spring and was told that the batteries were probably 2 years old, though I have been unable to verify that. So last month after I charged it, I took a look at the voltage levels. My highest came out at 12.68 and the lowest was 12.47. I figured that was fine, but then I started researching voltage levels and it seems 12.7 volts is considered 100% while 12.2 is 60% and time to charge it up again. Needless to say, I was surprised. So I began to wonder how much variation there should be between batteries.
It may depend on where they are in each string, and if you have anything connected to the 12+ constant live terminals.

Do the voltage checks and note the positions as I have suggested.

Do you let the charger finish? (ie do the over charge) have you watered recently?
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post #9 of 29 Old 10-03-2019, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Grumpyb View Post
If there are high level of partial charges, that could suggest that the pack has not been given the chance to get balanced on a regular basis (Thats the point of the over charge stage at the end of the charge), That can mean that the pack isnt as overall charged as it could be. That may be sorted by a couple of full cycle chargers. It needs to be taken into context with the number of overall charge cycles. If its a high proportion of the charges are not being allowed to full cycle, that could mean that the weaker batteries have been pushed too low in use and may now not perform as well as they could all through their discharge cycle. The regular over charge also sort of protects the batteries that go high voltage(likely to be the waeaker ones), as it gets the whole pack to a more level voltage so one battery is not constantly going very high voltage .

A flag to check a bit further. Data really just adds to your understanding of what the pack is doing and how its been treated. But its really down to how the vehicle actually runs, and how its been maintained.
If buying a 2015 with original pack, I would assume that I would need to replace the pack in the near future, and factor that into my overall cost expectations.


Ok makes sense. Thanks for the explanation


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post #10 of 29 Old 10-03-2019, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tundraman View Post
Might be a simple question. To measure battery voltage do I have to disconnect them all from each other and test each battery individually?
No. Put the meter leads on each battery.

Voltronics 160Ah Li-ion conversion kit is installed in my 2013 EV.

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