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post #1 of 37 Old 08-24-2018, 10:27 AM Thread Starter
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Wiring up accessories

So I'm ready to hook up some accessories and I've done research and figured I'd share my findings here before I go ahead and order everything.

I plan on installing a 50" curved LED light bar, mini light bar for the front bumper, 2 rear pod LED lights, 4 amber strobes (front/rear), 6,000 pound winch, and power angler for the plow. That's all I plan on adding but would like to have room for future expansion, like adding a radio someday.

From what I read, it's best to run like 4 ga or 6 ga wires from the battery to the terminal block under the hood and then from there run positive wire to a 80 amp circuit breaker and then run the postive wire to a Stinger SGP38 80-AMP Battery Isolator and Relay and run the battery postive wire from the relay then to a fuse block, looking at the Blue Sea 6 circuit and have the ground wire go from the terminal block to the fuse block. Then I would run a wire from 12v ignition source from the terminal block to the 80 amp replay so the relay only triggers when the key is on.

All the lights would be wired to the fuse block and have their own circuits.

The winch would obviously be wired directly to the terminal block (from the winch contactor) to bypass the circuit breaker and relay so it can use all the amps it needs. Though, I am unsure how I would wire the power angler for the plow. I haven't looked that far into that yet.

For the accessory wiring for the lights, I would run 14-2 gauge marine grade jacketed wiring. Everything will be soldered and heat shrinked.

From what I read, this should work and should be safe. I just want to make sure I do it right to keep my rig from burning up lol.

Any advice would be awesome. Thanks. Maybe I'm a bit overkill but can't hurt to be safe.
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post #2 of 37 Old 08-24-2018, 03:43 PM
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Yep, you're on the right track. Just make sure that solenoid is rated for continuous duty. I've had a few that were labeled as continuous duty but were intermittent use only. That one seems cheap for a true continuous duty, but it could be. Just to verify once you have everything installed, activate the solenoid (no accessory load needed) and the lower body of it should not exceed ~150 degrees in 5 minutes or so. Best if it only gets "warm". If it's not continuous duty rated, it can shoot over 200 in that time and it won't live long and can cause melting or even fire in the worst of cases.
I've switched to the EZ-GO solenoids for most of the projects I've been doing lately. Although they are bit uglier being the round silver style lol. They're technically overkill in terms of rated amps (300 amp) but the solenoid itself never even gets warm running it for extended periods. Good luck on the project!
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post #3 of 37 Old 08-25-2018, 06:29 AM
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Normally you will see two hot red wires and two black ground wires on lightbars. One of the red wires will got to the keyed
side of you blue seas 6 accessory hookup, and one to the full time terminal that will run your light once you turn it on.
Of course the black ground wire just go to a ground. The blue seas is a good idea, and makes wiring multiple accessories
easier. Just don't hook the Blue Seas to the full time, only the keyed side. If you check my profile you will see which blue
seas fuse block to get... If you haven't purchased the lightbar yet, a 40 or 42 inch will give you much more light than
you can imagine. It fits the roof better and doesn't stick out for branches to catch on it. Look for one that used 180 watts
vs 240. Much easier on the battery.

2013 Polaris Ranger 900 XP Camo
Blue Sea #5025 Fuse Block w/Neg. Bus
Seizmik rearview + Side view mirrors
MotoAlliance Firestorm Cab heater w/defrost
MotoAlliance Viper 4000 lb winch 1/4" syn rope
Rockford Fosgate radio and speakers
40 inch led lightbar / Glass windshield, poly rear
27 inch Mud Gear Innova tires / Beast Eyes
Rear EMT bumper / 4 inch lift kit


Ranger put the word laughter in slaughter..

Last edited by Downeaster; 08-25-2018 at 06:32 AM.
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post #4 of 37 Old 08-25-2018, 06:35 AM
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Just me but I wouldn't run a 6ga wire directly off the battery terminal very far without putting a fuse in line. Remember every inch of wire between the battery and the first fuse is unprotected wire. If that wire should rub on a metal surface and the insulation wears off you have a pretty serious high current short on your battery. The battery and the wire could be significantly damaged. Generally speaking the fuse size is determined by the wire it is protecting. It also protects the battery from potential shorts. In the case of 6ga that is probably in the neighborhood of 50 to 60 amps for the fuse and rating for any terminals related to the circuit. I might be off on that current rating you should investigate the situation your wire will run in. Conduit ratings are different than 'open air' and then temperature is also a factor. A wire running close to the engine or transmission might have a lower rated fuse requirement. Also running the winch without fusing seems risky. The idea isn't to protect the winch (although that isn't a bad idea) the fuse is to protect the battery, wire and down stream terminal blocks. Wires from the battery terminals to the first fuse should be as open and clear and as protected as possible. I think in the ranger the battery is under the driver's seat area. I don't think I would leave that immediate battery box area without fusing regardless of wire gauge. Electrical fires sort of suck not to mention the thrill of blowing up a battery located right under my back-end.
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post #5 of 37 Old 08-25-2018, 06:37 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Longslyde View Post
Yep, you're on the right track. Just make sure that solenoid is rated for continuous duty. I've had a few that were labeled as continuous duty but were intermittent use only. That one seems cheap for a true continuous duty, but it could be. Just to verify once you have everything installed, activate the solenoid (no accessory load needed) and the lower body of it should not exceed ~150 degrees in 5 minutes or so. Best if it only gets "warm". If it's not continuous duty rated, it can shoot over 200 in that time and it won't live long and can cause melting or even fire in the worst of cases.
I've switched to the EZ-GO solenoids for most of the projects I've been doing lately. Although they are bit uglier being the round silver style lol. They're technically overkill in terms of rated amps (300 amp) but the solenoid itself never even gets warm running it for extended periods. Good luck on the project!
Ahhh okay. That makes sense. I should get a continuous duty solenoid then. I wasn't aware of that.

I really don't know how many amps I need, but I doubt all LEDs would hit 100 amp draw even when they are all on at the same time.

So this one looks like it might be a good option > https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FGJI714...detail_2?psc=1

As for the battery cables, I'm thinking about just using 4 gauge welding cable and soldering my own ends on since I can get those for free I would think 4 gauge would be enough to handle the LEDs and the winch at same time and not get hot.
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post #6 of 37 Old 08-27-2018, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by nerwin View Post
Ahhh okay. That makes sense. I should get a continuous duty solenoid then. I wasn't aware of that.

I really don't know how many amps I need, but I doubt all LEDs would hit 100 amp draw even when they are all on at the same time.

So this one looks like it might be a good option > https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FGJI714...detail_2?psc=1

As for the battery cables, I'm thinking about just using 4 gauge welding cable and soldering my own ends on since I can get those for free I would think 4 gauge would be enough to handle the LEDs and the winch at same time and not get hot.
Yes 4 gauge is great for the current draw. You will not overrun that cable.
You definitely want a continuous duty solenoid. otherwise you will burn a standard one out very quickly. Don't get too hung up on the big current draw most solenoids list, the solenoid will work fine for lower current draws and probably last longer also. That rating is for current load across the terminals, not the engagement circuit.
Keep in mind when adding accessories, you're best to keep the total load at 50 amps or less. the Stator on the machine only put about 50 amps out at full song so if you run higher current draw you run the risk of draining the battery down. I've only seen a few instances of this happening and they were running too many HID lights and a powerful stereo. LED's draw less power and put out more light so it's a little tougher to overrun the battery with those, but still possible with the right combo of accessories.
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post #7 of 37 Old 08-29-2018, 12:04 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Longslyde View Post
Yes 4 gauge is great for the current draw. You will not overrun that cable.
You definitely want a continuous duty solenoid. otherwise you will burn a standard one out very quickly. Don't get too hung up on the big current draw most solenoids list, the solenoid will work fine for lower current draws and probably last longer also. That rating is for current load across the terminals, not the engagement circuit.
Keep in mind when adding accessories, you're best to keep the total load at 50 amps or less. the Stator on the machine only put about 50 amps out at full song so if you run higher current draw you run the risk of draining the battery down. I've only seen a few instances of this happening and they were running too many HID lights and a powerful stereo. LED's draw less power and put out more light so it's a little tougher to overrun the battery with those, but still possible with the right combo of accessories.
I'm thinking about replacing the stock halogen headlight bulbs with LEDs, that would low the amp draw right.

I mean I don't think having a lightbar, rear pod lights and maybe a front bumper mounted mini light bar would cause draw that much. But if I'm plowing and I got the lights on using the winch, I'm a little concerned.
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post #8 of 37 Old 08-29-2018, 02:35 PM
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You can run alot off the stock system, just have to do a little math. Take the wattage each of the lights use and divide by 12 to get amps. So, for example, a 240 watt light bar can take up to 20 amps itself. Takes ~10 amps to run the machines ecm, fuel pump, misc. Now granted, you aren't normally running "everything" at once so the amperage load is dependent on what you're running. A little common sense goes a long way so as long as you're aware of what each accessory uses for power.

If you're using the winch alot plowing at night with all lights on, you'll probably be using some reserve battery power since the rpms of the machine aren't always keeping the stator at full output. LED's will hide the fact that voltage is dropping. They don't necessarily "dim out" that much with lower voltage like halogen bulbs do. They can operate down to 9 volts depending on the led chips used. I've had a few guys drop their machine off and tell me there's something wrong with the winch because it would stop operating while they were plowing at night. Usually the winch is the first thing to work intermittenly, then the engine starts "missing" because of low voltage to the fuel pump and ignition. The whole time their lights still operate almost like a full battery so they don't realize what's actually happening. Those guys really had a load on the system though. They had the heater fan on full, Stereo blasting, all lights on, and used the winch for the plow quite a bit before the problem arose.

I'm not typing this out to scare ya lol! You can run a lot of accessories for a long time before low battery issues can show. You should be fine with a few lights and plow.

One thing you can do that can help if you're rear lights take a fair amount of amperage, is put them on a relay triggered from the reverse wires. That way the only time they are on is in reverse instead of leaving them on all the time. I've set up 3 position switches that give you an option to have the lights off all the time, or on in reverse only, or on all the time.
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post #9 of 37 Old 08-30-2018, 04:44 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Longslyde View Post
You can run alot off the stock system, just have to do a little math. Take the wattage each of the lights use and divide by 12 to get amps. So, for example, a 240 watt light bar can take up to 20 amps itself. Takes ~10 amps to run the machines ecm, fuel pump, misc. Now granted, you aren't normally running "everything" at once so the amperage load is dependent on what you're running. A little common sense goes a long way so as long as you're aware of what each accessory uses for power.

If you're using the winch alot plowing at night with all lights on, you'll probably be using some reserve battery power since the rpms of the machine aren't always keeping the stator at full output. LED's will hide the fact that voltage is dropping. They don't necessarily "dim out" that much with lower voltage like halogen bulbs do. They can operate down to 9 volts depending on the led chips used. I've had a few guys drop their machine off and tell me there's something wrong with the winch because it would stop operating while they were plowing at night. Usually the winch is the first thing to work intermittenly, then the engine starts "missing" because of low voltage to the fuel pump and ignition. The whole time their lights still operate almost like a full battery so they don't realize what's actually happening. Those guys really had a load on the system though. They had the heater fan on full, Stereo blasting, all lights on, and used the winch for the plow quite a bit before the problem arose.

I'm not typing this out to scare ya lol! You can run a lot of accessories for a long time before low battery issues can show. You should be fine with a few lights and plow.

One thing you can do that can help if you're rear lights take a fair amount of amperage, is put them on a relay triggered from the reverse wires. That way the only time they are on is in reverse instead of leaving them on all the time. I've set up 3 position switches that give you an option to have the lights off all the time, or on in reverse only, or on all the time.
Okay, so I should be pretty safe then and should drain the battery for what I'm doing. I have a long drive way anyways so I should be able to keep the RPMS high enough for a period of time which is probably good for the charging system.

I'm quite interested in your idea of the reverse lights. That would be rather cool! I just have no idea how I'd wire them in.

Would I really need a relay for the rear lights since they are so small?

Another question. I was considering getting 4ga welding for the battery cables but the Viper winch I plan on buying already includes a decent 4 (or 5ga) battery cable which I'd imagine would be plenty to run the winch and the accessories.
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post #10 of 37 Old 08-30-2018, 10:23 PM
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Okay, so I should be pretty safe then and should drain the battery for what I'm doing. I have a long drive way anyways so I should be able to keep the RPMS high enough for a period of time which is probably good for the charging system.

I'm quite interested in your idea of the reverse lights. That would be rather cool! I just have no idea how I'd wire them in.

Would I really need a relay for the rear lights since they are so small?

Another question. I was considering getting 4ga welding for the battery cables but the Viper winch I plan on buying already includes a decent 4 (or 5ga) battery cable which I'd imagine would be plenty to run the winch and the accessories.
Yes you need the relay for sure. The wires run off the ecm and are negative ground activated. If you just direct connect them, they will draw slight power and may ven glow very dimly. A relay solves this problem.

You would wire the universal relay like this:
Pin 85 and 86 go to the two wires of the polaris harness (located in the harness near the throttle body). It is not important which one goes where, it just makes a circuit.
Pin 30 comes from accessory power (or battery if you wish)
pin 87 (not 87a if you have one on the relay) goes to the positive of the rear lights.
Then your lights just get grounded to the frame (chassis ground)

the lights will now come on in reverse.
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