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Discussion Starter #1
Hi gang...newbie member here...looks like a great community.

So, I just bought a 2013 Ranger EV. It's in terrific physical condition and has a brand new US Battery 48v 155ahm bank, professionally installed.

However, the batteries are running down excessively quick. With the high speed setting, I'm getting about 5-6 miles before the meter shows a single bar. I was suspicious that maybe the gauge was wrong, as I had checked the voltage at a single gauge bar, and it still showed 49.0v. 49.0v should be waaaay above a single bar(10%). So, today I thought I'd test that theory and see what would happen if I kept running it down. We'll, shortly after the single bar stage, the gauge started blinking and then I began to lose power quickly. I was near the house, so I didn't run it to long in this depleted state. It's now recharging. I checked the battery voltage just after this and they were in the 49v range.

I've checked the batteries under load, and they seem fine. I've checked them when fully charged, and they seem in the proper range. I've checked them individually and as a set....all seems fine.

I'm wondering if anyone can think of a reason that new batteries, properly installed, would run down so quickly, show a quick depletion on the gauge, and then begin to lose power....even as they're showing 49v+ on the multi meter?

Also, is it possible that the factory battery gauge is tied into the EVs control system and when that gauge shows itself to be excessively low, the vehicle enters a slow mode(in theory, to save power)? So, even though the battery had plenty of voltage, the vehicle is behaving as if they're depleted?


Any help would be appreciated.

Jay
 

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My guess is that they are not broken in yet. How many charges have they seen? I believe it’s like 25 before they reach full capacity. Also that 5-6 miles is that on easy driving flat ground or some hills?


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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks sawtooth1... That may be it. I've only cycled those batteries 5-6 times so far. They may need more seasoning. Also, while quadruple checking the connections, I did detect the negative lead to be loose. So, I really tightened it down. (yes, that should have been step numero uno!). I'll need overnight to see if it helps.

Oh, and my driving is on flat asphalt.

I'm also noticing that the dash battery light (not the gauge /meter) is flashing, but is very, very faint. I don't know if that's standard or even is an indication of anything at all?

I'll post up tomorrow whether my tightened connection helps. If anyone has any more ideas or has encountered anything like this in the meantime, feel free to come in.

Thanks to all...
 

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Lead do take a few cycles to get to their charge.
But try the following.
Charge it as fully as it will go. Then disconnect each string so they are no longer in a parallel connection and isolated from each other. Neither string connected to the vehicle. (Takes out any issues of the charger being in circuit) Leave them for say 30 mins to settle. Measure each battery voltage, and note it. Leave them for a day. Take the voltages again and note them. If any have dropped appreciably then you should be able to see that, it could indicate that you have a problem with that battery. A drop in voltage will pull the other parallel string down eventually to the sum of the string this one is in. That will cause a drop in range and a lot of issues with batteries being heavily unbalanced. If the charger is set to a less aggressive over charge, the unbalance wont get taken care of, and the unbalance will just get worse. Easy check,
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi gang ... So, it's with some degree of embarrassment that I report back. Turns out, my issue stemmed from the simplest of causes: the primary negative cable was not adequately tightened at the battery. I fell victim to my own bad troubleshooting process. That is, I skipped past the most obvious causes, assuming I couldn't possibly have missed the easy stuff.

I'm happy it was an easy fix and I'm also happy to leave this post here, should someone encounter similar symptoms. I'm now getting solid, sustained voltage levels and estimate my high speed range in the 20 mile zone(batteries are still seasoning)

Now, on to changing my charge profile to 11, 71, or 72(seems like everyone has a differing opinion on this....has a consensus been reached?)

Thanks to those that helped out.
 
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