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Discussion Starter #1
I was riding with friends last weekend and my 570 EFI stalled on me three times. The first was going up a long hill and when I had almost reached the top it was like I had taken my foot off the gas pedal. The engine died, but I immediately restarted and it ran fine for several minutes. It stalled again on another hill and restarted easily. The third time it stalled, I was going downhill. I babied it back to camp and declared the adventure to be over. When I got home, I checked the fuel pump and everything seemed OK. I have fuel pressure a little over 50 PSI and running the pump for the pre-start cycle three times, I got 250 ml of gas, so I don't think I have a volume problem.Even though the pump checks out OK, I'm willing to put in a new one, but I'm not convinced it will fix the problem. I pulled the pump out and the filter looks reasonably clean. I have no reason to suspect bad gas as I always use stabil and I don't run through water. Does anybody have any ideas? I've got 6700 miles and 620 hours on the rig. You can tell I'm a real speed demon.
 

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Double check, but I believe your unit calls for 58psi +/- a couple psi. 8psi low would start to give you problems. It's best to check pressure with hot engine under load.
 

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Thanks. My pressure reading is approximate since I don't have an injection test system.I had a zero to 100 PSI gauge lying around and I cobbled up a connection. I have no way to measure the pressure with the engine running. I would not be opposed to purchasing an injection test system if anyone has a suggestion as to what aftermarket system will work.

I have a new fuel pump on order and will give it a try. Your point about low pressure possibly giving problems may be right on. I didn't want to complicate the issue but we have been having cold start and idle problems for about a year. If the new pump fixes that, maybe we have found the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Actually, I haven't purchased the fuel pump yet. Getting old, I have this problem of starting a purchase and not pulling the trigger. At my wife's urging, I looked for my delivery date and found that I had never ordered it. I did purchase the fuel injection test kit recommended by Spaz, but it didn't work as it had no way to connect to the fuel pump and gauge at the same time. I returned that and purchased BETOOLL Fuel Pressure Test Kit 0-100PSI with 9.49,7.89,6.30 Fuel Line Fittings , which does make the connection and allow me to run the vehicle and monitor fuel pressure at the same time. That system indicates that there is nothing wrong with my fuel pump. I'm getting 58 PSI and plenty of fuel flow.

I just ordered a new fuel injector, but that is to fix a problem we're having with poor idle and a tendency to die until it gets warmed up. I'm guessing a possible dirty injector, but I don't think that explains my stalling issue. I did purchase a service manual from service manual warehouse and that is very helpful ($20).

We have scheduled a trip this coming week with a friend who will follow us around in his Gator in case we get stuck. We'll probably put in a couple of hundred miles. It may sound strange, but I sure hope it dies and leaves us stranded. Intermittent problems are a bear to diagnose. To just throw parts at this doesn't make sense. I haven't priced everything out yet, but I think it could be about $1.5 to 2K to replace everything and the service manual says that 80% of EFI problems are caused by wiring. Unfortunately, testing wiring on an intermittent problem would be an exercise in futility.
 

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Gd, sorry that gage didn't work for you. 58 is right on the money. One thought though. Did you do any inclines while testing. Reason for asking. If the fuel pickup line in the tank has a split or crack, and a half tank of gas or less, you could be sucking air or purging fuel back into the tank when the fuel sloshes to the front or back of the tank. Hope I explained that right? I've heard of it happening before. Make note on your trip if it happens and how much is in the tank and when it happens. Hope it goes well for you though.
Take care.
 

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Feel free to follow my thread about my 2016 570 efi ranger as i will be updating with updates and hopefully resolutions.
Thank you for your update!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Gd, sorry that gage didn't work for you. 58 is right on the money. One thought though. Did you do any inclines while testing. Reason for asking. If the fuel pickup line in the tank has a split or crack, and a half tank of gas or less, you could be sucking air or purging fuel back into the tank when the fuel sloshes to the front or back of the tank. Hope I explained that right? I've heard of it happening before. Make note on your trip if it happens and how much is in the tank and when it happens. Hope it goes well for you though.
Take care.
Feel free to follow my thread about my 2016 570 efi ranger as i will be updating with updates and hopefully resolutions.
Thank you for your update!
Feel free to follow my thread about my 2016 570 efi ranger as i will be updating with updates and hopefully resolutions.
Thank you for your update!
Feel free to follow my thread about my 2016 570 efi ranger as i will be updating with updates and hopefully resolutions.
Thank you for your update!
Sorry I have been delayed in updating this string. I have wanted to wait for the final solution and I think I am there .
We went out with buddies last week and determined for sure that it is the fuel pump that is failing. It appears to be a heat issue. I need to run the vehicle hard for about 50 or 60 miles to get it to fail. Once it fails, it will typically run again after a few minutes cooling and then fail again within about 10 minutes.
The way we determined this is by attaching the fuel injector test gauge and a volt meter monitoring the electrical input to the pump. When the engine died, the fuel pressure was less than 20 PSI and the voltage to the fuel pump remained on for a few seconds until the ECM turned it off.

I first ordered a fuel pump from eBay for about $75. It claimed to be a replacement for the 2204945 original pump. Unfortunately, it was too short being 13 inches long while my tank depth is 14 ½ inches. I sent this pump back.

I then considered getting the official Polaris pump. After the problem with the made in China eBay pump, I figured that it was worth spending the $195 or so at Polaris to get the factory pump. Unfortunately, the $195 was the September price. On October 1st, they raised the price to $425. They had superseded the 2204945 part number to 2208613, but I had got the $195 price from Polaris on both pumps just a couple of weeks before.
During my conversations with Polaris, I found that I could by an aftermarket pump from them made by Quantum (highflowfuel.com). I ordered the Quantum pump through Amazon. When I received it, that pump was 13 ½ inches long. Talking to Quantum support, which I find to be excellent (they speak English as a first language) they said that the pump I ordered (HFP A396) is the correct replacement for the 2204945 and should be 14 ½ inches long. During my conversation with the Quantum rep, he took good notes. I now see that Quantum lists a different number for the 2015 Ranger namely HFP-A3963 as the correct pump to replace the 2204945. It looks like their catalog was wrong. I returned the original quantum pump to Amazon and decided to purchase a pump rebuild kit from Quantum. This kit is part # HFP-396-U4.
I like the quantum products because they have a lifetime guarantee and good customer support.
Now the postal service got involved to delay my project. My kit was originally scheduled to be delivered on Saturday Oct 9th.The postal service sent it to my local post office on Whidbey Island 5 times between Friday and Tuesday and 4 times my post office sent it back to the mainland. It seems that someone at that post office doesn’t know that even though it has a different zip code than my address, they still deliver my mail.
After the additional delay for the Columbus Day federal holiday, I finally got the kit and installed it. The installation is reasonably easy except for the difficulty in removing the cover over the pump. I needed to unsolder the wires and stretch the fuel line to its limit to get the pump part off of the steel rods of the pump module.
The Ranger is now running fine.
If you choose to do a rebuild using the Quantum pump, I’d suggest that you not replace the fuel lines unless absolutely necessary. It is very difficult to remove a fuel line from a barbed fitting without damaging the fitting. If you cut the fuel line to remove it, you are very likely to put notches in the fitting that might end up leaking. Also, the new fuel line provided with the kit is too short to allow you to disassemble the pump the way I describe above.
I recommend this YouTube video as a good one on rebuilding the pump although their pump does not have the problem about getting the cover off of the pump like the 2204945 pump has.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sorry I have been delayed in updating this string. I have wanted to wait for the final solution and I think I am there .
We went out with buddies last week and determined for sure that it is the fuel pump that is failing. It appears to be a heat issue. I need to run the vehicle hard for about 50 or 60 miles to get it to fail. Once it fails, it will typically run again after a few minutes cooling and then fail again within about 10 minutes.
The way we determined this is by attaching the fuel injector test gauge and a volt meter monitoring the electrical input to the pump. When the engine died, the fuel pressure was less than 20 PSI and the voltage to the fuel pump remained on for a few seconds until the ECM turned it off.

I first ordered a fuel pump from eBay for about $75. It claimed to be a replacement for the 2204945 original pump. Unfortunately, it was too short being 13 inches long while my tank depth is 14 ½ inches. I sent this pump back.

I then considered getting the official Polaris pump. After the problem with the made in China eBay pump, I figured that it was worth spending the $195 or so at Polaris to get the factory pump. Unfortunately, the $195 was the September price. On October 1st, they raised the price to $425. They had superseded the 2204945 part number to 2208613, but I had got the $195 price from Polaris on both pumps just a couple of weeks before.
During my conversations with Polaris, I found that I could by an aftermarket pump from them made by Quantum (highflowfuel.com). I ordered the Quantum pump through Amazon. When I received it, that pump was 13 ½ inches long. Talking to Quantum support, which I find to be excellent (they speak English as a first language) they said that the pump I ordered (HFP A396) is the correct replacement for the 2204945 and should be 14 ½ inches long. During my conversation with the Quantum rep, he took good notes. I now see that Quantum lists a different number for the 2015 Ranger namely HFP-A3963 as the correct pump to replace the 2204945. It looks like their catalog was wrong. I returned the original quantum pump to Amazon and decided to purchase a pump rebuild kit from Quantum. This kit is part # HFP-396-U4.
I like the quantum products because they have a lifetime guarantee and good customer support.
Now the postal service got involved to delay my project. My kit was originally scheduled to be delivered on Saturday Oct 9th.The postal service sent it to my local post office on Whidbey Island 5 times between Friday and Tuesday and 4 times my post office sent it back to the mainland. It seems that someone at that post office doesn’t know that even though it has a different zip code than my address, they still deliver my mail.
After the additional delay for the Columbus Day federal holiday, I finally got the kit and installed it. The installation is reasonably easy except for the difficulty in removing the cover over the pump. I needed to unsolder the wires and stretch the fuel line to its limit to get the pump part off of the steel rods of the pump module.
The Ranger is now running fine.
If you choose to do a rebuild using the Quantum pump, I’d suggest that you not replace the fuel lines unless absolutely necessary. It is very difficult to remove a fuel line from a barbed fitting without damaging the fitting. If you cut the fuel line to remove it, you are very likely to put notches in the fitting that might end up leaking. Also, the new fuel line provided with the kit is too short to allow you to disassemble the pump the way I describe above.
I recommend this YouTube video as a good one on rebuilding the pump although their pump does not have the problem about getting the cover off of the pump like the 2204945 pump has.
Sorry, it looks like I can not post a URL. Look for
Pt.2 2016 Polaris Ranger EFI Fuel Pump Troubleshooting And Repair For Under 30 Dollars
 
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