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Looking to see if it's normal for the clutch to engage hard after it's been sitting for a bit? It happens when the clutch first engages but nothing after that. No problems after it has moved for the first time or a hard time finding High low neutral or Reverse. I bought it new in 18' and it has 300 miles on it. I beleave the factory warranty is almost up and was looking to see if this is normal or not? Thanks in advance!
 

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Yeah, you will see a harder engagement on the first go of the day. I bring my 900 up to a certain speed and hold it. The sheaves will take a second and then pinch the belt between the pulley and I am off smoothly. If I get a little more RPM, I'll chirp the "tars" on my tile floor in the garage. The stock flyweights on the primary are not lubricated. Any lube on them would get slung off. So they slide metal to metal and the first go is a tad sudden. Things work better after its warmed up and the primary has engaged a time or two. The belt friction from initial slippage as well and the friction from the primary pinching the belt put a fair amount of heat into the mechanism quickly.


If your wife wins the lottery, install a DuraClutch II ($1250) as they have an internal centrifugal clutch and engagements are butter smooth warm or cold. Order one for me too! :)
 

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I sort of thought when I plunked 15 grand down at the polaris dealer that I was done. It is starting to look and sound like that is not the case. My xp900 sounds like most of the other posts here. Clunking, missing gears, crappy clutch engagement, plus my developed a funky whine/grinding noise after about 150 hours. I tend to tap the gas multiple times until I feel the clutch engage. If I just punch the gas and go it makes one heck of a bang, snaps in and chirps the wheels. So I don't just "go". I feather the gas up and down until the clutch snaps in. Pretty disappointing for the price. I need another machine sometime in the next year. I believe that I'll take a look at the Yamaha but I am thinking that i might be missing that 900 motor.
 

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The 900/1000 drive train is awesome from the engine to the tranny but comes up short at the primary and secondary. The shift selector needs to be adjusted correctly out of the factory and then again, once more, if necessary before the warranty period expires due to cable stretch. The old shifter mechanism is problematic but, actually works pretty well once worn in, if lubricated. I have not yet taken my shifter cable out for cleaning and lubrication yet. IF you can get the right gear selected, the transmissions are relatively trouble free. If you wiggle the selector into gear and are still getting any grinding -GET YOUR SELECTOR ADJUSTED IMMEDIATELY. Grinding gears are a quick way to damage your transmission.

The biggest problems experienced by owners is in the primary-secondary belt drive. On my 4hp Rupp Enduro mini bike in high school, that nearly identical part was referred to as the "torque converter" which is actually the wrong name. (Its actually a variable ratio belt drive clutch assembly.) But under 4hp, it wore well and worked awesomely. Putting 80+ hp into the same design is risky given that people like to mash the GO pedal and haul ass. That puts a tremendous load on the belt. I love the one new poster who, after a few beers, accepted his neighbors bet to see who had the more powerful machine. Tying the two machines together, the Ranger driver won but totally melted his belt down in the process. Afterwards, his Ranger would limp along as the belt went round and round and the fried section, that was melted way narrower, passed the primary. Lurch-lurch-lurch.... Fortunately, he was able to clean off the pulleys and throw a new belt on and he was back in business.

The variable ratio pulleys have very few moving parts. That makes them super reliable. It also makes them a little tenuous on first engagement, as in backing out of the garage. Like one of the earlier posters, I accelerate the motor to around 1400 rpm and wait. After a second or two, the primary smoothly grabs on to the belt and we are off and running where I roll in more gas. Nice and easy. Can you always do that? Not always but, I try to get rolling with minimum RPM.

Try to keep in mind that the only clutch material used to get your 1300+ lb machine rolling is rubber on metal. Yeah, its special high temperature rubber that is reinforced with Kevlar but it will still melt if hit with enough RPMs and opposition, like a hill or a load. I have some hills on my property. I try and park cross hill if at all possible to make starting out easier. If I am forced to start out on a good incline, I always use LOW to get it engaged with the minimal load on the belt. At the top of the hill, I stop and shift into HIGH and go on my way.

Guys have read the story a zillion times but it bears repeating. An older guy parked next to me with his older 800 Ranger one day. We were chatting and he said, "Yeah, the transmission was making noises like it was about to explode the day I drove it off the lot. Still makes the same noises after ten years but it runs like a champ." The same is true for the 900/1000 if you take it easy engaging your belt from a stop each time.

Just sayin'.
 

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Yeah, you will see a harder engagement on the first go of the day. I bring my 900 up to a certain speed and hold it. The sheaves will take a second and then pinch the belt between the pulley and I am off smoothly. If I get a little more RPM, I'll chirp the "tars" on my tile floor in the garage. The stock flyweights on the primary are not lubricated. Any lube on them would get slung off. So they slide metal to metal and the first go is a tad sudden. Things work better after its warmed up and the primary has engaged a time or two. The belt friction from initial slippage as well and the friction from the primary pinching the belt put a fair amount of heat into the mechanism quickly.


If your wife wins the lottery, install a DuraClutch II ($1250) as they have an internal centrifugal clutch and engagements are butter smooth warm or cold. Order one for me too! :)
DuraClutch is the cure!!
 
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