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2013 Bobcat 3400XL Diesel
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Discussion Starter #1
First post! I thought I would try to share some information on the Bobcat since it is less common than the Ranger. I recently bought a used 2013 Bobcat 3400XL Diesel. It is a high hour unit (2160hrs) that I'm sure was either a rental or commercial unit beforehand. I got a decent deal on it because the transmission/gearbox was making a popping noise and slipping. After test driving it I was sure the main drive chain in the gearbox was slipping. So I knew I would have a fair amount of work in refurbishing parts of the machine, but I figured by doing the work myself I would end up with a more solid machine than if I had bought a similarly used machine without the gearbox issue. Maybe my experiences will help others who have, or are contemplating purchasing, a Bobcat or Ranger.

First order of business is to get the gearbox fixed. I have already torn it down and found that the main drive chain was stretched. Luckily the sprockets were fine. Unfortunately both the front and rear output shaft splines were badly worn. I replaced both output shafts and the main drive chain. It sits right now with the silicone curing before I put the CVT clutches back on. Note that the front output shaft comes with bearings already installed, so you don't have to purchase those separately. The bearing puller/separator set from Harbor Freight worked a treat to pull the bearings from the rear output shaft. I attached a pic of the old and the new drive chain showing the stretch of the old one.
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While waiting for the gearbox parts to ship, I went ahead and replaced a broken rear wheel stud. Luckily there is enough clearance to remove and reinstall a new stud without removing the brake disk or anything. The fit is not as tight as I imagined they would be, and they are easily driven out without removing the hub or anything. I normally do not install wheel studs by pulling them in with a lug nut, but these fit just loose enough that I didn't worry about over tightening the stud. They are 3/8" wheel studs. Dorman makes a 3/8 flange nut that looks like a good replacement for the lug nuts if you need a local source; I found them at Oreilly. Unfortunately when I was replacing the stud I quickly discovered that the a-arm bushings were shot. So far I have only removed the lower rears. I knew it would be a potential issue, and yeah, I am not a fan of the design. On the one side I had to use a cut off wheel to carefully cut through the bushing flanges and cut through the bolt/sleeve since they were seized together. Replacement bolts are over $5 each (ouch!). I'm waiting on pricing information from a seller who has metal bushings (oilite type?). My plan is to install those with new insert sleeves and bolts, and to install grease fittings.
 

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2013 Bobcat 3400XL Diesel
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Discussion Starter #2
The Bobcat uses a separate high and low beam headlight housing with separate bulbs. One of mine was burned out. The bulbs are a proprietary design with no direct automotive equivalent (that I have found). I noticed the bulbs are dual element, with a 3 pin connector. Only one element is used in the bulb, and depending on whether it is installed in the high beam or low beam location determines which element is lit. Having figured that out, I swapped the burned out bulb from the high to the low beam housing, and it works fine there. So now both high and both low beams are working. Has anyone found an aftermarket replacement that is a direct fit? Looking at the base for an 881 bulb I am wondering if I could trim the top tab to narrow it a bit and maybe it would work.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
On the topic of the CVT: The whole CVT (primary and secondary clutches) has been replaced on mine before I purchased it. They have date stamps of 2018 and 2019, so definitely been replaced recently. They look great. When looking at the belt position, it makes contact with the inner sheave on the primary and has a gap on the outside. I plan to shim this when I reinstall the clutches and that will hopefully improve the shifting. I may eventually get a Duraclutch, but what's on it now looks great so I am going to run it for now at least. They are stamped as Team, which I guess is a Polaris OEM brand? The gearbox case has the exact same stamp/branding on the inside of it.

Looking at the Bobcat parts catalog there is a speed kit available which is supposed to increase the top speed. From what I can tell, the only part that would make that difference is a different limiting bushing for the primary. It's shorter than the original, so it seems this would allow the primary to close up more and increase the overall gear ratio more than original? I'm also not sure without disassembling it whether this replacement clutch on mine has an original spec bushing, higher speed spec, or something else. Anyone changed this out to get more top end from their machine?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not sure this thread is getting much traction, but I'll post a few more updates in case it helps anyone out there searching. The gearbox is now reinstalled and working great. The new output shafts and new yoke for the rear prop shaft really helped all of the play that it had before. In the rear prop shaft there wasn't even a roll pin...there was a shoulder bolt...that did not fit that well. I'm sure that contributed to the wear, but the front output shaft was worn pretty badly too. I installed the new yoke with the appropriate roll pin. Before installing the new yoke I also drilled and tapped holes for 1/4-28 set screws to help with the last remaining bit of play. This mod is covered elsewhere already so I'm not going into that.

While looking over the machine I also discovered that the front air intake prefilter assembly was gone. Not just the prefilter box, but the whole intake tube that comes up through the hole in the frame crossmember. At this point I start questioning whether I really should have bought such a well used machine that wasn't properly maintained. Oh well, I'm already in it this far and I know the gearbox will be solid for a long time. So the search began for the proper prefilter components. Come to find out, the Bobcat uses a different intake tube than the corresponding Polaris Ranger for those same years. From what I can tell, it is unique to the Bobcat models. Luckily I found a used set of parts on eBay that included that whole section of the intake and prefilter. Score! So I ordered that, then it arrived only for me to find out that piece was missing from the lot. The box appeared to have been repacked by FedEx and there was a delivery exception. It had to have either fell out when the box opened in shipping, or FedEx just left it out when they repacked the damaged box and just figured I wouldn't notice. As luck would have it, I was able to find another set of used intake hoses from a different seller and bought those. They arrived and it was exactly what I needed. After a good cleaning I installed the new parts along with the prefilter itself I had already purchased.

Check out the old prefilter tube for the front, or what's left of it! It looks like someone just cut it off with a hacksaw and left it that way. Makes me shake my head...
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Discussion Starter #5
Now back to the A-Arm bushings. I'm getting ready to start on the front end bushings, tie rod ends, and ball joints. I have corresponded back and forth with beastbushing (eBay) to put together a set of bronze bushings and sleeves to redo the whole machine. The listing is now active as a complete set for a Ranger 570. That model uses struts in the front like the Bobcat. I have already replaced all the bushings and sleeves in the rear using All Balls kits so I could get the machine going while I was working on the bronze kit with beastbushing. So I may just run those in the rear for now. While I had the rear A-arms out, I went ahead and drilled & tapped for a grease fitting in each one. If you do this, pay attention to the depth of the threads on the grease fitting so it will not interfere with the insert sleeve for the bushings. I shortened the threads on a few right angle grease fittings so they would clear properly. I used the right angle style on the rear top and used regular straight ones on the rear bottom. The straight style was luckily short enough that they worked as-is. I used 1/4-28 size grease fittings. Drilled the holes with a 7/32 drill bit and then tapped them. I thought about putting a hole into each insert sleeve so the grease would get inside there and keep the bolt from rusting, but the sleeves are hardened steel. I just left them as-is for now at least. I did grease the bolts up before putting them back in, and packed the outer groove of the bushings with grease. I just don't want the bolts or sleeves to rust and seize up like the factory ones did. I guess theoretically if the bolts are tightened up so that the sleeve is held firm, then the rotation happens between the bushing and sleeve. It just didn't stay that way on this machine.
 

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I’m new to the forum also. Keep up the posts. Interesting reads. I thought about buying the bobcat version of the ranger but found a fair deal on a Polaris so I went that route. I have a 2013 also with the Yanmar.
 

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I'm following this post, just recently got a 2011 3400xl diesel and having turd mode issues. Thinking of redoing the rear diff. It will go into turf mode on occasion and will only stay in for a minute or so before it goes neutral.
 

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I have a 2013 3400xl gas.
slowly Replacing parts. Just put a new clutch in - and drive belt. Now when I drive at top speed it sputters? In neutral Ican go full throttle and no sputtering. Any ideas?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Since I have been stuck at home due to COVID-19, I went ahead and started working on the front suspension. First, I would recommend that if you need to replace the ball joints, buy or build one of the special puller tools for it. When I really got into the front end I figured out that the ball joints, tied rod ends, wheel bearings, brake rotor, strut mount pieces, and struts needed replacing. Yeah all of that.

Ball Joints: Mine were severely worn. Comically loose. The first task is to remove the retaining plates on the bottom. Those are held on with two 1/4-20 countersunk screws. They use a 4mm allen wrench. Mine were a real pain to remove. I broke one of my allen head sockets. Heated the area where the screws go, tried again, broke another one. Finally drilled the heads on the remaining ones and used a screw/bolt extractor. That worked for 2 of them and broke the head off the last one. After the head broke off I was able to just remove the plate, drill the threaded portion smaller, and use a smaller extractor and it came right out. I'm not sure if maybe someone replaced them previously and over tightened them or what. The screws, from the factory, have a judicious amount of blue loctite on them. I ran a tap into each one to make sure the threads were good. Interestingly those holes are threaded pretty deep. Much deeper than the screws in them. I'm sure this is for use with the "factory" style puller and installer.
I didn't have a puller tool and I didn't really want to wait on one to ship. The alternative is to place the threaded portion into a vise and heat the housing around the ball joint. Then you "just hit the housing and it pops right out." Well, mine did not come loose that easily. I heated the housing a lot with a propane torch and still had to beat on the housing more than I thought I would. By then the threads were buggered, so I had to finish it that way. I would recommend using a soft faced or dead blow hammer so you won't ding up the bottom of the housing. The good news is that the new ones went in without too much trouble. Heated the housing and had the ball joints in the freezer. Dropped them in and drove them down with a deep well impact socket. Worked well enough, but still slightly affected that raised ring on the bottom of the ball joint. Had to file that just a bit for the plate to fit back over correctly. One of the ball joints bottomed out in the housing and still protrudes up ever so slightly. Just enough to make a slight gap for the plate. If you wanted to make your own puller you can google some pictures. The basic principle is a short sleeve with thick washers on top. You use the retaining nut to tighten and pull the ball joint from the housing. I went ahead and bought a homemade one off eBay pretty cheap so I'll have it for next time.
The new ball joints are sealed. Older style had an open top. The housing has no grease fitting, but the older Polaris stuff with struts did. No idea why they eliminated that grease fitting. If mine seem to wear too fast I'll probably drill the housing for a grease fitting and drill a hole in the top cap on the ball joints. For a "sealed" design, the bottom of the joint is pretty wide open. That little rubber skirt boot does not really seal the joint.

Tie Rod Ends: These were cheap aftermarket, and very easy to replace. Be sure you get the set where both of them are left handed thread.

Wheel Bearings: Mine were shot. The service manual says to remove the clip and drive them out with a punch, in the three notched cutouts around the circumference. OK this works fine to get them started, but if yours are like mine, you'll be rotating the punch between those 3 places and hammering for a week to get them out. The manual also says to drive them until they are about flush with the outside of the housing and then support just the edges so you can drive it out. OK, but based on the shape of the housing, how are you supposed to support it on the edges, and still hold a punch, and hammer at the same time? I pulled in someone to help by holding the housing. Still very very slow going. I finally got tired of that and pulled out the air hammer with a wide flat punch. I used that against the inner bearing race, rotating it as I hammered. That worked a LOT faster. I know the service manual says not to hammer the inner race, but my bearings were already shot...and it worked fine. If you are careful you can do it without scarring up the housing bore. On one of mine I did put a small ding in it. Used the dremel with a sanding drum and smoothed it out.
Installing the new bearings was quite easy. Had the bearings in the freezer and heated the housing. Drove them in with a basic bearing/seal driver pretty easily. At least one thing was easy!
The wheel bearing is a common one with aftermarket options. I ordered a pair for a Sportsman 570 EFI. I ordered them from eBay seller BossBearing.

Brake Rotors/Discs: One of mine was worn more than the other due to the caliper dragging. I measured it with a micrometer and it was well below spec. You could easily see and feel the wear ridge on the inside. The service manual says to heat the bolts to remove them due to loctite, but mine came right out. On the dragging caliper I pushed the pistons back and used the brake pedal to extend them a few times. I applied some mineral oil around the outside of the piston to see if that would help loosen any crud and make it move smoother. We'll see. I will probably just need to rebuild both calipers, but they are easy enough to remove so I'm going to try them like this first.

Struts: After taking the struts loose from the top mounting positions I discovered that on one side, the bottom mounting dome was broken. The spring retaining cup was also bent. Hmm, maybe all of that contributed to my hard steering! Also found that one of the struts was pretty much shot, you could feel the air pockets in it when you moved it by hand. Found some aftermarket gas struts on eBay that I am going to try. I ordered new bottom plastic mount "domes" and straightened the spring retainer cup. The aftermarket brand is Race Driven, and they are model 7020. 7030's are longer overall. Maybe those would work for someone wanting to lift without adding strut spacers? eBay seller baydenoc-powersports_7 sells the aftermarket struts. Two of them are cheaper than a single OEM replacement. We'll see how they do.
 

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2013 Bobcat 3400XL Diesel
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Discussion Starter #10
I also just received the bronze replacement A-arm bushings from eBay seller beastbushing. Due to the COVID-19 craziness he is having some supply issues, so shipped everything except two rear hub sleeves. That's fine for now since I have replaced all the rear stuff for now anyway. Figured I would go ahead and do the fronts since I have it torn down. The good news is that the front bolts were all in good shape. At least two of them actually had anti-seize on them! The bad news is that apparently they were replaced at some point and whomever did the work, torch cut part of the mounting bracket. That will be a simple enough welding fix in the future, but for now I straightened the mount out best I could. I drilled and tapped each A-arm bushing mount for a grease fitting like I did the rears. I used 1/4-20 straight grease fittings, but I should have used 45 or 90 degree ones. I'll probably replace them later on. The new bronze bushings fit tight into the A-arms and the sleeves fit kinda tight in them. Now for the interesting part: the new bushings have flanges that are ever so slightly thinner than OEM. So I got to put the arms in the mounts and immediately notice the amount of gap on either side. No way I was going to just crank the bolts down and try to pull the mounts in that much. Not sure if this is the best idea, but I discovered that the flat washers that were on the front wheel studs under the nuts, fit these A-arm bolts very well. They are also pretty thick. So I ended up placing one washer in each mount location, on the rear side. That took up enough of the gap that I could tighten the bolts down, hopefully tight enough to hold the insert sleeves tightly. Also interesting is that the insert sleeves supplied by beastbushing are correspondingly shorter than OEM.
23212
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm following this post, just recently got a 2011 3400xl diesel and having turd mode issues. Thinking of redoing the rear diff. It will go into turf mode on occasion and will only stay in for a minute or so before it goes neutral.
Yeah mine is not going into Turf Mode either, I don't think at least. When I make a sharp turn in the gravel you can tell it seems to dig a little on the inside wheel. I read something in the service manual about a sensor or something, that if not working correctly would not let Turf Mode engage. I plan to work on that too. I did read that the actuator on the rear diff activates for Turf Mode, and is off for regular locked mode. Maybe start by checking to see if that actuator is getting power when it should be?

I have a 2013 3400xl gas.
slowly Replacing parts. Just put a new clutch in - and drive belt. Now when I drive at top speed it sputters? In neutral Ican go full throttle and no sputtering. Any ideas?
No idea there, sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Side Mirrors: Bobcat makes a nice set of side mirrors as an accessory. They are pricey though. After some online research and looking at pictures, I figured out the mirror heads and the mounting arms are made by Britax. If you look at the numbers on the back of a mirror, it gives you the specs. The mirrors are slightly convex and comply with e11 II 03*6325 and E11 II 026325 standards. To complete your own kit, you will have to fabricate adapter plates and spacer bushings. If you will note, on the roll cage where these mount, the bolt heads and the nuts are recessed into the mounting locations. I made mine to closely emulate the factory kit, based on the pictures I could see in the Bobcat parts manual. If you want to make your own kit you will need:
  • (2) Britax 7182.320.A mirrors Britax Mirror
  • (2) Britax mounting arms 7200.025.A Britax Mirror Arm
  • (4) 3/8-16 x 2" bolts, Grade 8 recommended
  • (4) M6-1.0 x 12mm bolts (I used 10m long, but would use 12 and may switch mine)
  • (4) spacer bushings that fit the 3/8 bolts and protrude far enough from the mounting location to allow the plates to clear the rollcage
  • (2) adapter mounting plates
  • (4) lock nuts (I reused the factory nylon insert lock nuts)
For the spacer bushings, I happened to discover that an A-arm bushing sleeve fits pretty well. If you read above you know I had several of these laying about. They are a tad too large OD, but I ground flats into two sides on them so they would fit. I'm pretty sure the factory spacers are just thinner wall, so I feel pretty good about how strong these are. If you go this route, you can grind a little more on one end of each spacer and it will help it to fit down into the bottom of those locations, where the inside corners are a little rounded.

I didn't take precise measurements of the spacer bushing length, or the width of the adapter plates. I used some metal that I had on hand and just mocked it up using the parts. I can try to get measurements if someone wants to build their own set. The biggest thing about the spacer bushings is to make sure they are long enough that the adapter plates will clear the roll cage and the weld in that location, so the plates will sit nice and flat. Get the adapter bushings all the same length and make the cuts square so that everything lines up properly and holds correctly. You don't want to fudge it much on this since it is a mounting location for the front of the roll cage. When you take the mounting bolts out of the roll cage to mount this, I would recommend you use a ratchet strap to hold the cage in position just in case. That or you could take more of the cage loose, whatever works for you.

A couple of measurements I do remember:
  • holes for the mirror arms are spaced 30mm apart on center. A 15/64" drill bit is very close, but you can step up to 1/4" if needed. I did just because my spacing was a hair off. The difference is very minor.
  • holes for the roll cage bolts are spaced 21.25mm apart on center, I'm pretty sure. Make your own measurements though ;-)
Here are a few pics. For the pic of the bushing being measured, I used a permanent marker to color a band around the bushing and then lightly scribed it with the caliper. I didn't record the actual length, but I did lock down the slide on the caliper so it maintained a consistent measure. I would also recommend only cutting the factory olive colored sleeves. Aftermarket are often hardened and will be tough to cut. It can be tricky to get a good square cut. Not sure I used the best method but here's what worked for me: I have a table for my portable bandsaw to make it a vertical bandsaw. After I scribed the bushing, I lightly cut all way around, rotating it by hand as I went and paying close attention to the scribe line. I positioned mine so the cut was adjacent to the scribe line, but that depends on how you measure and mark it. After making the initial cut all the way around, I kept rotating as I cut until it was all the way through. It actually turned out remarkably accurate and square considering I did it by hand. If you have a lathe then it would be simple to make them.
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Pic of completed plates, spacers, and hardware
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All mounted up
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So far the mirrors are working out pretty well. It's a little weird having two convex mirrors. I might consider just using regular flat mirrors, which are available in the same style. Also, the diesel engine idle makes the mirrors shake a lot. It smooths out as revs increase and while moving, but sitting still it's bad. I'm sure the factory kit would have the same issue. These also appear to be very similar to the mirrors used on some old Land Rovers, so you might find some options by searching that too.
 

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I'm interested in your description of "popping" I purchased a VERY used 2011 Ranger 900D with over 2,000 hours on the clock a few years ago for a hunting buggy. It too has been making and intermittent "clunking" or popping sound. At first I thought it might be a CV or universal joint but now I'm not so sure. As mentioned, the noise is intermittent. I don't have the mechanical ability or tools to tear the transmission down myself, though.

First post! I thought I would try to share some information on the Bobcat since it is less common than the Ranger. I recently bought a used 2013 Bobcat 3400XL Diesel. It is a high hour unit (2160hrs) that I'm sure was either a rental or commercial unit beforehand. I got a decent deal on it because the transmission/gearbox was making a popping noise and slipping. After test driving it I was sure the main drive chain in the gearbox was slipping. So I knew I would have a fair amount of work in refurbishing parts of the machine, but I figured by doing the work myself I would end up with a more solid machine than if I had bought a similarly used machine without the gearbox issue. Maybe my experiences will help others who have, or are contemplating purchasing, a Bobcat or Ranger.

First order of business is to get the gearbox fixed. I have already torn it down and found that the main drive chain was stretched. Luckily the sprockets were fine. Unfortunately both the front and rear output shaft splines were badly worn. I replaced both output shafts and the main drive chain. It sits right now with the silicone curing before I put the CVT clutches back on. Note that the front output shaft comes with bearings already installed, so you don't have to purchase those separately. The bearing puller/separator set from Harbor Freight worked a treat to pull the bearings from the rear output shaft. I attached a pic of the old and the new drive chain showing the stretch of the old one.
View attachment 23115

While waiting for the gearbox parts to ship, I went ahead and replaced a broken rear wheel stud. Luckily there is enough clearance to remove and reinstall a new stud without removing the brake disk or anything. The fit is not as tight as I imagined they would be, and they are easily driven out without removing the hub or anything. I normally do not install wheel studs by pulling them in with a lug nut, but these fit just loose enough that I didn't worry about over tightening the stud. They are 3/8" wheel studs. Dorman makes a 3/8 flange nut that looks like a good replacement for the lug nuts if you need a local source; I found them at Oreilly. Unfortunately when I was replacing the stud I quickly discovered that the a-arm bushings were shot. So far I have only removed the lower rears. I knew it would be a potential issue, and yeah, I am not a fan of the design. On the one side I had to use a cut off wheel to carefully cut through the bushing flanges and cut through the bolt/sleeve since they were seized together. Replacement bolts are over $5 each (ouch!). I'm waiting on pricing information from a seller who has metal bushings (oilite type?). My plan is to install those with new insert sleeves and bolts, and to install grease fittings.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm interested in your description of "popping" I purchased a VERY used 2011 Ranger 900D with over 2,000 hours on the clock a few years ago for a hunting buggy. It too has been making and intermittent "clunking" or popping sound. At first I thought it might be a CV or universal joint but now I'm not so sure. As mentioned, the noise is intermittent. I don't have the mechanical ability or tools to tear the transmission down myself, though.
It's a little hard to describe in words. With mine you could tell that something was slipping when it was happening and it got worse with more load/pull on it. On a flat surface I could accelerate slowly and it might not do it, but if I tried to start up a hill, it would just slip/pop/grind like crazy. It didn't sound like a traditional gear grinding. Low range made it worse too. When I first brought it home it was pretty cold out, low 30's outside and at first it wouldn't slip as much. A few days later when it warmed up it was worse, and it was worse after driving it a little. Depending on how yours was used before you bought it, and with that many hours, if the chain has not been replaced then I'd say there is a fair chance it may need it. Maybe yours wasn't abused like mine before you purchased it and it's only beginning to show that symptom. If that's what it is, and it gets worse, you'll be able to tell I think.
 

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Thanks for the reply. Well mine was owned by a single owner presumably on some type of farm. I don't recall the exact number of hours but the odometer was over 12,000 miles!!! I don't have service records but was told by the Polaris dealer I bought it from that it had been well maintained and recently had some major repairs. As I said before, the "click click click" sound is intermittent and is more pronounced when the rear diff is locked, particularly when turning. That's why I suspect it was a CV joint. I did notice some slipping the last time I had it at the lease but that was accompanied by no noise, so I chalked that up to a long overdue belt change. For now I'm going to order and install a Duraclutch so I don't have to shut it down to shift gears anymore. Regardless of whether or not the transmission needs work I would do that upgrade anyway.

Recently I had to run to a dealer in Marble Falls, TX near where my lease is to purchase a new ignition switch. While I was there I picked up oil and a filter. When he asked which engin and I told him Yanmar he said "oh you have the GOOD diesel!". I figure the engine could outlast at least two entire Rangers. LOL.
 

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I always carry a roll of TP in the glove box for those turd mode issues. LOL :)
I'm following this post, just recently got a 2011 3400xl diesel and having turd mode issues. Thinking of redoing the rear diff. It will go into turf mode on occasion and will only stay in for a minute or so before it goes neutral.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Thanks for the reply. Well mine was owned by a single owner presumably on some type of farm. I don't recall the exact number of hours but the odometer was over 12,000 miles!!! I don't have service records but was told by the Polaris dealer I bought it from that it had been well maintained and recently had some major repairs. As I said before, the "click click click" sound is intermittent and is more pronounced when the rear diff is locked, particularly when turning. That's why I suspect it was a CV joint. I did notice some slipping the last time I had it at the lease but that was accompanied by no noise, so I chalked that up to a long overdue belt change. For now I'm going to order and install a Duraclutch so I don't have to shut it down to shift gears anymore. Regardless of whether or not the transmission needs work I would do that upgrade anyway.

Recently I had to run to a dealer in Marble Falls, TX near where my lease is to purchase a new ignition switch. While I was there I picked up oil and a filter. When he asked which engin and I told him Yanmar he said "oh you have the GOOD diesel!". I figure the engine could outlast at least two entire Rangers. LOL.
I'd love to have a Duraclutch on mine, and I might do that some day. For now the whole clutch assembly on mine has already been replaced and it had a new belt, so I'm gonna run it like it is for a while at least! When I put the clutches back after doing the transmission work, I did add another shim to the backside of the secondary clutch to help even up the front to back position that the belt rides on the primary. I don't really know if it helped the shifting. Sometimes mine shifts just easy as pie and other times it takes a little jerk motion and it pops right where you want it. I think the belt drag contributes in some circumstances, but when I had the whole gearbox out and actuated the shifter directly by hand, it still had pretty stiff detents I thought. So a certain amount is probably normal. It sounds like yours has an abnormal amount though.When you replace the belt, look closely at where it rides on the primary side and make sure there is an even gap at the front and back, so it isn't dragging on either the front or rear sheave.

I had read similar anecdotes on the durability of the Yanmar Diesel. It's one reason I took a chance on the well used unit I bought. After seeing how dirty the airbox was, and how they had completely removed the prefilter, leaving the intake open near the front bottom where it could suck in all sorts of garbage....I'm really hoping mine still lasts for a long time. If not then I guess I might learn how to rebuild that too!
 

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I also have a 2013 3400 diesel, United Rentals neglected, it would make popping /slipping noise under load, turns out the slip yoke at the trans on the shaft to the front diff was almost smooth inside, not much left of the splines. And it had a travel limit bushing in the drive clutch. Tossed it, Helped top speed a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I also have a 2013 3400 diesel, United Rentals neglected, it would make popping /slipping noise under load, turns out the slip yoke at the trans on the shaft to the front diff was almost smooth inside, not much left of the splines. And it had a travel limit bushing in the drive clutch. Tossed it, Helped top speed a lot.
Both output shafts were pretty worn on mine so I replaced them when I replaced the chain in the gearbox. I need to check the front yoke and support bearing for the front driveshaft now. So how bad was it to remove that limiting bushing from the clutch? I figured that's how the speed was limited after I saw the parts in the Bobcat speed kit. I have glossed over the clutch disassembly in the service manual but haven't tried it yet.
 

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If you remove the bushings that regulate the speed, do you have to replace them with new ones that are a different size?
I bought my 2012 from united rentals and it would only go 17mph so I took it to Bobcat and had a 35mph speed kit installed. On the bobcat website it appears that the Speed kits are just new bushings. Well it only will go 27mph now so I'm trying to figure out where to look and what to look for that could be causing the loss in top speed. Wore out drive belt, stretched throttle cable...?
 
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