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Discussion Starter #1
im just wondering how deep is too deep for a stock ranger? ive taken her in water that was about to the floorboard but i was scared to go any deeper. i wasn't sure where the intake was and i didn't want to flood the engine.
 

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Your intake is located up under your hood then it draws though the floor board then to the intake and trans.
If you like your rig as I do the underside of the floor pan is my max, I don't care for the seeping that can accure.
 

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My dealer mentioned the 2008's could handle 26" of water. I guess maybe that is the height of the intake under the hood.....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ya idk if id be comfortable goin much deeper than the floorboard lol. i asked the same question on prcforum.com and some guy said that for long crossings, the seat is the max but you can go a little over the hood for short periods of time. thats damn deep! i think id make a snorkle before doing those crossings
 

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Good rule of thumb is seat height. Seapage shouldn't be an issue. They are pretty well sealed off.
 

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We've had couple of inches in the floor board - with the exception of when we got stuck in the river (drop off in and on a sand bar plus 4wd wasn't working) there was about 6 inches. no problems.
 

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I guess I am more anal than most. My rule of thumb is anything higher than wheel bearings is too much.
 

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I was told many years ago by my boat dealer a little trick that has served me well over the years. It also has some relation to ATVs.

When ever a boat is trailered to the launch area the bearings get warm. If you immediately back the trailer into cold water the instant cooling acts like a suction and water gets into the bearings. Seemed like I was replacing the wheel bearings just about every season even though I was keeping them greased and had bearing buddies on them.

A good indication of this is to check the grease in the wheel bearings. If it is at all milky then water has gotten in and you need to change it.

Dropping anything that is warm or hot into cold water is never a good practice and completely submerging stuff like hot differentials and trannies is asking for trouble. When ever you do submerge them, know the original color of the fluid and check it soon for the milky look! All fluids work by maintaining a particular viscosity and water, even just a little bit, will change the fluids properties and protective values.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well what if you snorkle your rig? then the only bad part is having the hot metal stuff touching the water but no water will get in right?
 

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Not true according to my info and experiences.

I have owned 4 Sportsman 500s and never had any one of them in water much deeper then my ankles. Thats a long ways from the intake but over the diffs and tranny.

All of them exhibited a propensity to get water in the differentials and I think it gets there by way of seapage past the seals when going from hot to cold. Keep in mind also that seals are designed to keep the fluid inside and not necessarily to stop outside water from getting in.

A snorkle will certainly allow you to go much deeper and continue to run but it will not help any of your vital parts that were never designed for total submersion.

Gary
 
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