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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys, brand new member here.

I just bought a 2012 Ranger EV for $500 and I'm looking for some advice. I've been reading through the forum and gathering information, but I figured it was time to reach out to see if the folks here may be able to help.

So, here's my situation:

All of the batteries are toast, and not even hooked up. The dates on them are 2017, and I have no idea how long they've been sitting. Voltage range form the batteries range from 4-5.8 volts. I may try to bring some back, but I would imagine its a lost cause at this point.

So, the first order of business is to get batteries hooked up and see if the thing even runs. I would imagine there are more issues than batteries, but I need to start somewhere.

I know the thing needs 48V to run, but I don't want to sink a small fortune into 8 new batteries only to discover that the thing needs thousands of dollars in repairs. So, can I wire up four deep cycle batteries in series and connect them to see if anything happens? Does the SEVCON require two 48V packs to run, or can I get it moving on one 48V pack?

I'm relatively handy with electronics and circuits, so I'm open to any and all suggestions at this point.

Thanks in advance for any help you may be able to provide.

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You don’t need all eight batteries. You can run (4) 12 volt batteries in series to get the 48 volts. Then you should be able to check if the EV has other issues. Do you know if that machine has been submerged? If it has you may be dealing with a lot of problems. Once you get 48 volts going into the main controller it will blink codes if you have some other issues. The motor and the main controller are the most expensive parts to replace. With that said it’s important to determine if those are defective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You don’t need all eight batteries. You can run (4) 12 volt batteries in series to get the 48 volts. Then you should be able to check if the EV has other issues. Do you know if that machine has been submerged? If it has you may be dealing with a lot of problems. Once you get 48 volts going into the main controller it will blink codes if you have some other issues. The motor and the main controller are the most expensive parts to replace. With that said it’s important to determine if those are defective.
Hey Lou, thanks for the quick response. I have no idea if the unit has been submerged or not, I don't have any history at all, so I'm starting from square 1. I'll see what I can do to get 48V to the controller and see what happens.
 

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Ah man, they used to have a bench seat! I like that better for letting kids ride along!

I just picked up my 2022, brand new Polaris EV tonight. But, it was dark so I used it to throw hay, got mud on the tires, and parked it in the garage, plugged in. It will possibly have a snow adventure this weekend.

Sorry, nothing to add of value to answer your questions! But, good luck and I hope you get your new (to you) one working!
 

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Congrats on your new purchase. I too am new to this forum, I have a 2014 EV Ive had for 3 years and have totally enjoyed mine. I have recently been dealing with a failed controller. This has been an eye opening experience. Right after I bought mine, I replaced all the batteries with Trojans, pricey but worth it in my opinion. I thought this would be the most expensive item I’d face, man was I wrong. My current problem is with the Sevcon Gen4 controller. A replacement controller is $2,000. You can find these on eBay used for $750-$1,000, but not excited on paying that much not knowing what I buying. This site is very helpful on information, another member gave me a repair facility in Pennsylvania that will repair Sevcon Gen4 controllers. The jury is still out of this because I paid $600 for them to repair, (with full 1 year warranty) it was gone 6 weeks, when it came back, it was doing the same thing as before it left. I must say at this point, they have been very helpful. I again sent it back to them last Friday, so we’ll see what happens next. With the sticker shock of the controller, I started looking into what other parts cost. The drive motor is $3,500. The main contactor Is $300, the DC-DC converter is $400. All this doesn’t include labor. (Like you, I am blessed to be in the electrical field (an electronic tech by training and electrician by trade). The most disturbing thing Ive ran into are the Polaris dealers within 100 miles of me offer no or very little support of EV. (How crazy is that?) Their mechanics are combustion engine mechanics, know very little about EV’s. It is apparent that it is very easy to snowball into big $$$ money with these thing. Not sure where you live but Ill double your money If you want to unload yours before it starts snowballing… :)
 

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Congrats, I've got to say $500 was a steel. I've had my 2010EV since 2013 and must say it's been a great machine, for us. We use it around our 8 acres to run down to the pond, check on our bees put feed out for our cows and all types of hauling stuff around here. I do have to say, I've had my share of expenses with it. Its mainly been because of batteries. In the 8yrs of owning it I've replaced the batteries now three times. If i put numbers to it, it does make it sound like a lot of money. As for a Polaris shop helping with repairs, the only thing you'll get from them is the bill for the expensive parts because the mechanics do not touch the EV's. Fortunately I've been able to do all my own repairs, that have ranged from replacing the CV boots, brake pads, re-configure and re-wire the Q charger. All this I owe to this forum and all the good folks on here that post so many situations that helps so many of us. So best wishes to on your adventure with the new (to you) EV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay gents, I have a positive update to post! I was able to get her running today with nothing more than new batteries. I re-made all the battery cables because the originals were corroded, and in bad shape.

Also, I was able to get some second hand batteries for $20 ea. they hold a charge well and they fit perfectly. They’re sealed lead acid, but whatever. They run the machine, so I’m happy for now.

So, the good news is that she runs. The bad news is that it seems to be stuck in 4x4. Also, the headlights don’t work, and the high/low/max range switch doesn’t seem to work. What should I look at to rectify these issues?

Also, the SEVCON continually flashes 2.

I’m looking forward to ironing out these issues, and getting this thing back up to 100%. I appreciate and welcome any advice you have to offer.
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Okay gents, I have a positive update to post! I was able to get her running today with nothing more than new batteries. I re-made all the battery cables because the originals were corroded, and in bad shape.

Also, I was able to get some second hand batteries for $20 ea. they hold a charge well and they fit perfectly. They’re sealed lead acid, but whatever. They run the machine, so I’m happy for now.

So, the good news is that she runs. The bad news is that it seems to be stuck in 4x4. Also, the headlights don’t work, and the high/low/max range switch doesn’t seem to work. What should I look at to rectify these issues?

Also, the SEVCON continually flashes 2.

I’m looking forward to ironing out these issues, and getting this thing back up to 100%. I appreciate and welcome any advice you have to offer.
View attachment 27084
Late seeing this but hopefully you found that your dc converter is out that supplies 12v to the dash , lights awd, etc
 
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