Polaris Ranger Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at buying a ranger ev for hunting but the range isn't enough for my needs. I hunt hogs in 3-5 locations that are a a couple of miles apart.

Any thoughts on adding tow bar to ranger to tow it with my suburban for 3-5 miles between hunting spots. I have read about people using regen to charge batteries on extended downhills. Can I leave the ranger on to regen charge while towing? I can normally drive 25-45 mph on gravel roads between hunting spots.
If I left ranger in low to tow it, I know it will charge faster but what is top mph and fastest charge rate?
Can I burn up charger or will it dump power somehow?

Is this is a viable solution rather than going with a generator?

Thanks

Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
In theory yes but:

A couple of problems with your idea:

Top speed of EV, EV/LSV:
HIGH Mode = 25 MPH
ENDURANCE = 15 MPH
LOW Mode = 10 MPH

The way regenerative braking works is when the brakes are applied OR you are going down hill and the throttle is reduced to ZERO a reverse current is applied and turns the motor into a generator.

The regenerative aspect of the Polaris EV is small. I think I saw some data saying continuous down hill after reaching 50% battery depletion (reversing an uphill course) would only add a 3% reduction of total recharge time (8 Hrs - 3%). The charger is NOT involved in regenerative charging. Its a Battery <> Motor/Generator circuit via the Controller.

The Owner's Manual specifies the ignition be OFF when charging with 110v.

In addition the Owners Manual SPECIFICALLY advises the transmission be in NEUTRAL and the ignition OFF while towing the vehicle. It also applies when towing on a trailer with the vehicle secured with tie downs and Parking Brake ON.

There are other options:
- Installing a solar panel charger
- Using a gas generator during down time. *
- Plugging the EV into a 110v. outlet on a Hybrid vehicle while towing (on a trailer). I've done this on long trips with my Chevy Tahoe Hybrid. One could also install a 12v > 110v. inverter in a non-Hybrid vehicle
- Installing Lithium Batteries (and LiION compatable contoller, BMS and charger)
- There is also a quick charge kit that needs a 30 amp or 220 v circuit. (reduces charge time from 8 to 4 hours)

I have never had a problem with the OEM Charger. I have always kept the charger plugged in when not in use. EXCEPT when I was at an event in which I was using the vehicle intermittantly all day long. There was an outdoor plug and I plugged the vehicle in between runs. IT COOKED THE CHARGER. The service tech said that everytime the charger is initially plugged in it goes into FULL charge mode and then a maintainence trickle charge the rest of the 8 hours. In the FULL charge mode it gets hot. In an attempt to increase endurance I plugged the charger back in after each short run. By constantly plugging in and unplugging the charger thoughout the day it was constantly in Full charge mode and over heated. Did not hurt the batteries and I did have some increased endurance (at the expense of a new charger).

Note that charging while towing on a trailer, charging off another vehicle, charging with a portable generator are all meant for options off the grid but still need the 8-4 hours.

The solar charger option I think is the most viable for short term applications. You can do a google search for golf cart solar chargers. Some claim a 30% increase in endurance. However this is on low speed, easy terrain and fairly flat golf courses. It is also a seperate circuit applied to the batteries and does not involve the on board charger or motor.
Two systems are available
- hardtop with a solor panel (multiple manufacturers)
- thin film solar panel to be applied to a roof panel or lexan/polycarbonate sheet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the thoughtful reply.

Unfortunately I will be driving at night, so solar is out and lipo is too spendy… though I saw a rumor that Polaris may make a factory lipo option on larger ev, which would be nice. .

I was hoping for more regen power, my hybrid car regens pretty quickly. maybe an ev owner can get a tow for a few miles to see what regen is at 20 ish mph.
Would holding breaks down a bit help?

I may just have to go with a generator. Though I love rolling silent….

I probably need about 40 miles range, 2/3 slow speed and 1/3 wide open on gravel roads, with a bit of 4x4 here and there..


Thanks
B
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Things that decrease endurance:

Many variables decrease endurance:

- cold temps effect batteries
- hot temps effect motor
- Drive mode: single wheel best, 4x4 worst
- Power Mode ENDURANCE best, LOW speed (high torque) and HIGH speed (low torque) worse
- state of charge
- state of battery (age and sulfation)
- proper electrolyte level
- proper fluid level
- Surface: street and hard pack dirt better, mud, snow & ice worse
- Terrain: flat or downhill better. up hill worse.
- Weight: lighter is better
- Wind resistance: strength and direction vector + vehicle sail area (windshield/ back glass)
- Drive line resistance (bearing and and differential lubrication)
- Drive line drag (Drive Mode)
- Tire resistance: street tires with high inflatiion best

Any combination of any of the above is worse:

Ergo: Starting out at normal temps, in single wheel with new batteries at 100% charge, on dry pavement running on flat terrain or downhill, with NO accessories or passengers and NO load, NO wind or wind from the rear. A well maintained and lubed running gear on street tires at maximum PSI running in ENDURANCE mode at 10 MPH and avoiding any turns will result in best endurance and range. Anything else decreases endurance and range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I research that very very well before trying that. I know for a fact towing most golfcarts will fry the motor it the builder`s guidelines are not followed. I suspect that is the reason Polaris makes it plain not to tow unless the switch is in OFF
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top