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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone investigated using the RoyPow lithium batteries in a Ranger EV yet? I saw these being discussed earlier this month over on buggiesgonewild.com. They are getting some good traction as drop in replacement for 48 volt golf carts and naturally I think it would be great to drop in two in my 2014 EV. My original batteries are on their last legs as I recently discovered. I will need to do something soon and really would like to upgrade to Li to get away from all of the battery off gassing and maintenance (even with a softer charge algorithm).

Has anyone here heard of these or have any experience yet?

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I hemmed and hawed on ordering a 160 ah RoyPow but have not committed yet.

I pulled my 8 batteries and had 2 I suspected were bad. Finally today I made time to go and have them load tested at a battery shop. Sure enough 2 had a dead cell each. I talked with them about my options and the battery shop tried to push me towards replacement AGM batteries. I agree that these would be an improvement over the flooded cells from a maintenance standpoint and are a direct drop in replacement solution too. This local shop is not yet sold on lithium technology, and I suspect it has a lot to do with their normal customers not being able to afford them plus the lost future sales of replacement FLAs.

Since I did not commit quickly and kept asking what seemed to be informed questions the owner finally offered me a discounted price on a couple of replacement FLAs for my two bad batteries. I was leaning this way to buy me another year or two (hopefully) while more people get experience with the RoyPow batteries. Also, with the uncertainties in the world right now it was an easier financial pill to swallow. I got two Continental 12 volt replacements for $160 each, which was $40 off the first price I was quoted.

I'll clean up all of the mess from the boiled over battery acid and repaint the battery trays in the next few days. Then I'll reinstall everything and give her hell for as long as the batteries will hold up.

Thank you for those that took the time to reply. I'll come back and update this thread in the future if I can remember to.

Tim
 

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I have installed Allied in one Ranger and have one now almost complete that belongs to a elderly lady that a local golf cart service company put 2 48v insight batteries in. They are 30ah each and no range. The charger only charges to 90% and throws error codes cause the batteries BMS keeps trying to shut it off. The biggest problem w drop in batteries is none of them come w a accurate SOC. The allied advertised you always know how much charge you have. Their display is basically a digital meter. You have to let them rest for 15 minutes. I have ordered and installed 4 more insight batteries for the elderly lady cause she had to much invested already in 2 lithium batteries at 1300.00 each. I will also install a AILI battery monitor that is a shunt column counter SOC. She complained about not able to tell how much charge was left when driving her husband who is home bound and getting stranded away from the house. They have 130 acres. The Voltronixs kit is still unmatched in my opinion. Others with electrical skills and knowledge have used NISSAN leaf and Chevy volt packs to fabricate kits w proper BMS and wiring but not many are confident enough to tackle that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks boilermaker. I am definitely in the group that is not comfortable building my own battery pack. This is why I am interested in the RoyPow. For about $2,500 you can get a 160 ah 48 volt battery and their charger. It is billed as a drop in replacement for golf carts, especially the smaller sizes they offer.

Tim
 

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A few other questions so I can have this information somewhere that I hope will be easy for me to find.

If I remove all the 12 volt batteries and replace with one 48 volt lithium pack am I correct in that I will still need a 12 volt battery in the ranger? I do not have any heavy use accessories like a winch, just a couple of LED lights I wired off the 12 volt buss bar under the hood near the charger. What exactly will I connect to the 12 volt battery if I do need one? Can I fully bypass the 48-12 volt converter and if so how?

If these questions have been answered already please kindly point me to the correct threads and posts.

Thank you for sharing your collective knowledge here.
Tim
 

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Yes, you will still need a 12v battery. I do not believe that you can "start" the EV without a 12v battery. Many people have stated that if the 12v accessory battery dies, that even with a full main pack, the EV will not start or move.
 

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The original 12v gives a very low current tap that supplies things like the indicator on the charge lights. So yes you do need a 12v battery. But its not reqired to start the vehicle, all that is 48v and then powerd up by the DC to DC converter. But you do need a way of charging the 12v battery. On my Li Ion conversions which also need power for the battery pack monitoring system, I install a small 12v charger, and to keep it full in use I run a diode charge lead to the 12v from the dc to dc 12v output post. The smallest Li Ion I supply is a 180ah pack, but only because these particular cells have a very low voltage drop under load. Mostly they are the 240ah pack. There is a lot of variation with cell chemistry, and if its Lifepo4 then I would go a lot higher ah, they have qiute a voltage drop under load. My smallest Lifepo4 install a few years ago was 320ah., The ah quoted is also from absolute max charge voltage to absolute max discharge, when new, and is not the real usable ah. and it will diminish over time. Cell Life is extended if you dont go anywhere near either end of the charge. Over spec when you initially invest and the system will perform much better and degrade less over time. Under spec and repeatedly fully discharge and life expectancy will reduce . Your sevcon controller also needs to be re programmed. The pack voltage for shut down is in the 30v area. Thats into the falling off a cliff area of the Lithium cell voltage range. But you need to know the charge discharge curve of the particular cells you are using to get this set up for your specific pack chemistry and cell build up. Its important that the use of multiple 48v batteries has some form of integrated Battery managment system, to ensure that the charger gets shut down if there is a fault. If its just internal to each battery if one shuts down and is able to disconnect itself from the charge, the others will immediately see an increase in voltage that may do damage. Just be wary of easy install 48v drop ins. The charger algorithm is also really important. I install new algorithms to suit the packs I use, so I have no idea of the end of charge voltages on the std ones that algorithm also adds new feature to give an external signal control of the DeltaQ so enabling simple shutdown if a cell is high voltage or the temp goes too high. As std lead the chargers go to a float voltage and over chharge, thats actually dangerous on a li ion, unless the 48v battery has its own inbuilt disconnect.
 

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Hey Grumpy,

Does the dc to dc converter not get you the 12v you need for the buggy. I've done a golf cart conversion but those seem a lot easier than the Rangers.
 

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Yes DC to DC does supply the main power, but the 12v supplies the power for the charge lights and anything else you have connected to the permananetly live post. In the Li ion conversion I also need a constant 12v supply for the electronics.Tapping of one cell block to get 12v isnt an option for a Li ion, if you have 12v blocks that block will become lower in stored power than the rest. Thats one of the reasons the original vehicle over charges to get that 12v bleed off balanced with the rest of the pack. That is not a scenario you should ever adopt with Li in, especially where there is no common Battery Management across all the cell blocks that are fitted,
 

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Thanks Grumpy,

I wonder why I don't need that separate 12v in a golf cart, even with an on board charger? Any 12v apps where not needed until you turn the key and were handled by the dc-dc converter (which I upgraded to a 60-12v converter). My first pack was made from 18650's and has a max voltage of 58.8v. Obviously I don't run it that high or ever drain below 20% or 3.2v per cell. I'm also a big fan of BMS's and plan to run a Chargery 24S on this new pack.

What about the 2 pink wires going to battery #4 and #7? Are these the hot leads you speak of? Where would those terminate? I tried looking at the wiring diagram and it just confused me. Some much for that Louisiana education. LOL
 

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What about the 2 pink wires going to battery #4 and #7? Are these the hot leads you speak of? Where would those terminate? I tried looking at the wiring diagram and it just confused me. Some much for that Louisiana education. LOL
The 2 pink wires supply the "Constant Power" to the terminal block. It is labeled "B+" on this 2013 wiring diagram.

23439


23440
 

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Yes one 12v from each of the first batteries in each string. I believe they also have a diode in the lead, so dont feed back from anything connected back to them from the main power supply / DC to DC.
 
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