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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
We're new members from Chino Valley AZ and new owners of a 2009 Ranger XP. To make our new Ranger completely street legal we switched tires & wheels from stock to General Grabber AT2 27x8.50R14LT's with steel wheels. Our question is: how low a pressure can we run in these tires when on trails and not damage the tire or the sidewall?

Thanks, :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah the tire is heavy duty. They ride great on the highway but are a bit hard on rocky trails that's why I wondering how low a pressure I could run.
 

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The following statement was found at this site:
http://www.offroaders.com/reviewbox/showproduct.php?product=291&cat=3


A decent Mud Terrain tire for the price. That about sums it up for the General Grabber. The General Grabber MT is General Tire's solution to the offroad market for what they call "extremely difficult terrain". While we don't consider the General Grabber to be an "extreme" mud terrain tire when compared to the Mud Terrain tires on the market, it does hold it's own in off-road applications. The General Grabber MT is very similar to the average MT tire on the market in looks and performance. In the mud, it does decent while the tread is above it's half life. It's not the best in mud but a little better than average. The lack of sipes in the tread design does reduce it's potential traction somewhat on the road especially in wet weather driving although a lack of sipes is common in average MT tires. The tire does flex very well when aired down into the teens making it a good rock performer though the tire does lack sidewall protection but the 3 ply construction offers moderate protection from rocks and trail obstacles. The tire also does well in sand and snow. Overall when you look at the price and what you get for it, the General Grabber MT is a decent Mud Terrain tire for the price.

It recommends airing in the teens, I would start with 13 lbs and see how it does. Feel the tire after you have run for awhile, if it get real hot, I would add a little air. I run 13 lbs on my 14 inch big horns and they do fine, These tires should do ok at this pressure. If the tire looks flat, add a little air. My Big Horns start looking flat at about 7 lb. PSI.
 

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:) Thanks for the info. I'll try around 10 -12 lbs and see how it goes. I wrote awhile ago to General tire and asked them but they have never responded.
 

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Today, I took my second ride on my new Ranger 570 and I was at a more technical trail area. I checked my tires at 10 lbs before I left home. The ranger seemed to be riding rough and the front end felt loose in the river gravel. On my atv I ran around 5-6 lbs pressure. So, after a bit I stopped and checked them and they were reading 11-12 lbs I assume from the tires warming up. I backed them off to 8lbs and that improved my ride and handling. I will check in the morning and see where it is as the night will be cold in garage.
 

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On my rock crawler I ran 4 to 7 lb in my 44 TSL's with a 4000lb vehicle and they are bias ply. Truck radials on a Ranger should do fine at any pressure that will keep the bead on the rim IMHO. Polaris says 8 lb on the stock radials that come on a RZR S.
 
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