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If you look up values right now, they will be higher than they have ever been. Value is going to be determined by what specific model it is more than they year. If it isn't in running condition (meaning that you can't get the engine to at least turn over and fire), then I would go into it assuming it needed an engine and only value it as a rolling chasis. I've already experienced the "it only needs a starter" headache personally and refuse to ever have that experience again.

Tires should be obvious with a visual inspection - wouldn't bother me as I usually would prefer a different one than on it anyway.

Battery - should be able to confirm with a jump pack, or jumper cables to get the engine to turn over, so minimal issue.

Fuel pump - a bit tricky here, but if it will fire on ether I would be more comfortable going ahead. If you can't get it to fire it could be any number of issues from very minor to very expensive.

You have to ask yourself, if it was something cheap and easy why didn't he just fix it (or at least bandaid it) and sell it off?

Also, how long has it been sitting? Possibility that mice got into it if it's been sitting long? How well does your buddy maintain his other things?
 

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Is it possible to spray some starting fluid into the throttle body (if it has one) or something to see if it will fire up briefly? Going to take my jump pack with me. Basically trying to see if I can rig it some way to see if it actually runs.
yes, look for air filter cover. Remove air filter and give it a shot.

If you can get it that cheap, it would definitely be worth it. A set of decent stock wheel/tire takeoffs is probably worth $150.
 

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need more of the vin to lookup model and year to verify.

On the fuel pump, the cheap chinese pumps are notorious for causing issues, I'd go with a quantum for peace of mind.

I would pull and clean/flush the fuel tank, it's been sitting for awhile so I'd want to start fresh there.

I'd probably go ahead and get new NGK plugs and a new OEM air filter. Check all the intake pipes for signs of mice, clean/replace as necessary.

After that, I'd try a shot of ether (starting fluid) and see if it fires and go from there.
 

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Looking to do a oil and filter change. What's the recommended oil and filter to use? What gear oil is best to use as well?
That's a loaded question on a forum site, but since it's new to you and has been sitting, I'd recommend just getting the Polaris kit with everything and using their standard fluids to change it all out and start with a known product. They should have a kit that has all the oils, oil filter, air filter, maybe other stuff like belt, spark plugs, etc. I'd start there so you have all the oils, and then add in the other stuff as needed to get a fresh start with all the consumables.

As far as that electrical connection - I agree, looks like a ground, but it doesn't look factory. Probably something added and maybe later removed. Your buddy might remember, but if not and there isn't a wire hanging around there loose I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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I'd probably get a service manual at this point, as IME those tests and the expected values should be in there. I don't have any first hand experience with that engine so can't give any help with specifics. Other things to check would be valve clearances and timing.
 

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That's more of a personal preference and how far down the rabbit hole you're wanting/willing to go. For me, I consider the wrenching and learning a hobby within a hobby (this one as well as others) so I'd get the tools and dig in. But I also realize that's not for everyone.
 

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Most likely a clutch issue for the shifting while running. If I had to guess without being there and looking at it, I would say it's likely the bearing on the primary clutch is seized. If you open the clutch cover and watch, the belt should be stopped (or able to be stopped by hand) when the engine is running but the trans is in P or N. There is a bearing on the primary shaft that lets the primary spin while the belt rides on the bearing. If the bearing seizes up it basically grabs the belt as the primary spins and won't let the trans shift. If you do get it to shift into gear it will instantly lurch forward (or backward) as it's like shifting into gear while running.

Video that will explain it better than I can, also a great source to learn how the clutches work and what to look out for. More geared to the RZR lineup but the RNG lineup uses the same seetups.

HD Primary Bearing Video
 

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Not sure on the specifics of that model, but IIRC 1000-1200 rpm range should be typical.

When you remove the cover, if the belt is being driven by the primary at idle in P, then the next step is to take the belt off and check the bearing by hand. You should be able to reach in the bottom of the sheaves and spin the bearing. If it's locked up or gritty, it needs to be changed. It may be cheaper to get a whole new primary than the parts and tools to repair it though. This would be a good job to take to the mechanic if they have to tools and knowledge to repair. There are videos on Hunterworks site that do a good job of explaining this stuff so you know what to look for and how it all works.
 

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Belt - I would pull it and clean it with mild soap and water and inspect it. If there are no signs of heavy glazing or chunks missing, by all means go ahead and keep using it. Ideally, if you don't have a spare, I'd get a new belt and keep that as a spare, but that can wait until you get it fixed up and running reliably.

Axles - I would trust Tusk to be as good as stock, but I would recommend SuperATV Rhino 2.0s if available and you're going to spend the money. Again, I wouldn't invest in these upgrades until you get it running reliably first.
 

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The bearing can be replaced, but it takes special tools and they can be expensive. I'd check with the local mechanic you found to see if they can do it, or call Hunterworks and see what the price difference is between a new one and sending yours to be rebuilt
 

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There are wear components and there are areas to check that can't be fixed if out of spec, you have to tear the whole thing down to replace that bearing so a rebuild with fresh parts would be a good idea. The weights, the bolts that hold the weights, the rollers, and the buttons can be replaced. Beware cheap chinese parts though and get quality. Buying from a reputable source like Hunterworks will get you what you want. The clutch surfaces look good, so I'd suspect the clutch to otherwise be in good serviceable condition. Unless a worn part caused unseen damage, which again I don't think likely since most of the issues from this are due to it sitting and clutch wear is due to being run hard and put away wet.
 

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alignment can cause issues, yes. belt needs to be centered so that the edge isn't dragging on the clutch sheave. The big thing is to have a gap so it's not pinched by both sheaves, but if it's too far out of alignment it can still bind and grab on one sheave.
 

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I'm not sure how the prop shaft is mounted to the front diff on that one, but if it is a roll pin a 1/4" punch and air hammer is the best way to remove it.

Like this
 

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It would be worth renting an AC, that pin is a pain in the ass any other way but a air hammer buzzes it out in a couple mins. I'd try the 6gal first though, might be surprised, I've run mine in short bursts off my small trim nail compressor. It's small so it's the one that lives in the trailer.
 
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